Aluminum question

Discussion in 'Help I have questions!' started by Enpsyclopedia, Feb 17, 2020.

  1. Enpsyclopedia

    Enpsyclopedia Member For 1 Year ECF Refugee

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    I have been using only brass for the past few years. I decided I want to bring out one of my old aluminum mechs, but the threads are so oxidized, they are black. Polish won't work for this because its oxidation. Any tips on how to get these threads nice and shiny again? Any advice helps. Sorry if my lack of alumium maintenence is pathetic.
     
  2. Countrypami

    Countrypami The Link Ninja Staff Member VU Administrator Senior Moderator VU Vendor Employee VU Donator Diamond Contributor VU Live Host Member For 5 Years Reddit Exile

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    Try ketchup.
     
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  3. nadalama

    nadalama Senior Moderator Staff Member Senior Moderator VU Donator Platinum Contributor Member For 2 Years

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    Or Coca-Cola? Isn't that what some folks use to dissolve oxidation off battery terminals?
     
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  4. Enpsyclopedia

    Enpsyclopedia Member For 1 Year ECF Refugee

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    That could work.
     
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  5. Carambrda

    Carambrda Gold Contributor Member For 3 Years

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    Eagle One Nevr-Dull

    EDIT: and some nitrile gloves also
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2020
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  6. Carambrda

    Carambrda Gold Contributor Member For 3 Years

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    To remove the high points resulting from battery arcing damage (just the high points, not the pits... you don't want to scrub more metal off), use only the Heavy Duty version (not the regular version) 3M Scotch-Brite scouring pads.

    For just regular maintenance (not to remove corrosion) of screw threads on all my tube mechs I use only the type of contact spray that does not leave any kind of residue nor leaves any kind of "protective" layer, and contains no electrical grease/lube. Basically it's just isopropyl alcohol in a spray can using propene as a propellant, and some non abrasive additives to help clear oxidation. Anti-corrosion type stuff should only be used after you see corrosion already has appeared, as you don't want to keep polishing metal off of the screw threads all the time. You don't want that excess wear and tear on the screw threads happening if you can avoid it so, it's always better to store a mech with the parts screwed together tight, thus preventing heavy oxidation and corrosion before it happens.
     
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  7. BoomStick

    BoomStick Gold Contributor Member For 5 Years

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    Store it with parts “not” screwed together.
     
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  8. Enpsyclopedia

    Enpsyclopedia Member For 1 Year ECF Refugee

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    Awesome!
     
  9. Carambrda

    Carambrda Gold Contributor Member For 3 Years

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    The reason why you want to screw the parts tightly together before you store a mech is because oxidation and corrosion are kept to a minimum as a result from less air coming into contact with the screw threads.
     
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  10. BoomStick

    BoomStick Gold Contributor Member For 5 Years

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    And then when they do oxidize, they can’t be separated without damaging something. Your theories are defeated by reality.
     
  11. Carambrda

    Carambrda Gold Contributor Member For 3 Years

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    They simply don't oxidize, as there's no coming into contact with the oxygen from the air.
     
  12. BoomStick

    BoomStick Gold Contributor Member For 5 Years

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    Wow you’re dumb.
     
  13. MyMagicMist

    MyMagicMist Platinum Contributor Member For 3 Years ECF Refugee

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    Here's some ways to clean oxidized aluminum. Don't feel bad for not knowing. You at least came to a good source for finding answers. :)

    You knew that much which is 98% better than a lot of people who need help. Henry Ford only had a third grade education. He though created a business empire by knowing who to ask about any subject related to building cars.

    I had a welding course in high school twenty some years ago. I served in the military and would have worked with all kinds of metals. I can say I genuinely was not quite aware of the ways to remove oxidation from aluminum.

    It seems vinegar and water does the brunt of the trick. Would figure one could use lemon juice in place of vinegar. It looks as though the main point is to use some form of lightly acidic based water to clean up the parts, rinse and dry with a dry cloth. Yes, there is a suggestion to sand blast. I think that can be avoided unless you're doing something larger scale.

    I also wouldn't worry too much about sanding threads. Wash, rinse and dry ought to do a fair enough job. If you go on and sand the threading, a possibility exists to foul the threading. It can be done properly, yes, it takes a little "having done it" to have capacity. At most you might add just a little table salt to your acidic water solution, if you feel some grit is needed. Be sure though you rinse thoroughly.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2020
  14. Carambrda

    Carambrda Gold Contributor Member For 3 Years

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    Just don't pay attention to @BoomStick , he's having yet another bad day it seems. There's no point in trying to remove oxidation from aluminum, as it is a highly reactive metal type that oxidizes immediately the moment when it comes into contact with oxygen from the air, and, the resulting thin layer of aluminum oxide is what protects the metal against corrosion. But this protective layer can still be penetrated (under some specific circumstances actually much more easily than many think........) due to atmospehric corrosion. See: http://www.electrochemsci.org/papers/vol6/6126567.pdf

    So, each time when atmospheric corrosion punctures the protective layer of aluminum oxide, the bare aluminum underneath spontaneously immediately oxidizes, after which it corrodes again, oxidizes again, repetitively and so on, digging deep holes not wholly dissimilar to how @BoomStick keeps digging himself into deep holes all the time.
     
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  15. MyMagicMist

    MyMagicMist Platinum Contributor Member For 3 Years ECF Refugee

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    Thank you for some better information on aluminum. :)
     
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