DO NOT DO THIS AT HOME

Discussion in 'DIY E-Liquid - General Discussion' started by Vaperstek, Jan 25, 2015.

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  1. Vaperstek

    Vaperstek Founding Vendor Founding Vendor VU Vendor Bronze Contributor

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    NIcotine is a division 6 substance. Only 2 other classes exist above nicotines classification.. RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL and certain CORROSIVES,.... That is how dangerous it is.. DO you own or have a hazmat suit? Do you know how to clean up a spill??? Will you know if a drop or 2 lands somewhere ( shoe, countertop, pants)?

    You want to cut it in your yard maybe??? You have pets??? animals? They find a couple drops and sniff it or even walk over it, get the body bag.

    You want to deal with it and dont have a chemistry degree. I highly suggest you find someone who does and listen to every word they have to say. And for a good hazmat suit, plan on spending at least 3-5K. You plan on dealing with pure nicotine and not have a scba system in use while dealing with it, I do not care who you are, you are FOOLISH.

    You better have a plan in place for EVERY SINGLE STEP ALONG THE PROCESS OF DEALING WITH IT,

    AND YOU BETTER NOT MAKE ONE MISTAKE, IT MAY BE YOUR LAST.

    AND IF YOU DO DIE FROM IT,( GOD FORBID) YOU HAVE JUST SCREWED THE WHOLE INDUSTRY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



    Division 6.1: Toxic substances

    Division 6.2: Infectious substances

    Reason for Regulation

    Toxic and infectious substances can pose significant risks to human and animal health upon contact.

    Commonly Transported Toxic Substances; Infectious Substances

    1. Medical/Biomedical waste
    2. Clinical waste
    3. Biological cultures / samples / specimens
    4. Medical cultures / samples / specimens
    5. Tear gas substances
    6. Motor fuel anti-knock mixture
    7. Dyes
    8. Carbamate pesticides
    9. Alkaloids
    10. Allyls
    11. Acids
    12. Arsenates
    13. Arsenites
    14. Cyanides
    15. Thiols/mercaptans
    16. Cresols
    17. Barium compounds
    18. Arsenics / arsenic compounds
    19. Beryllium/ beryllium compounds
    20. Lead compounds
    21. Mercury compounds
    22. Nicotine / nicotine compounds
    23. Selenium compounds
    24. Antimony
    25. Ammonium metavanadate
    26. Adiponitrile
    27. Chloroform
    28. Dichloromethane
    29. Hexachlorophene
    30. Phenol
    31. Resorcinol
     
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  2. Vaperstek

    Vaperstek Founding Vendor Founding Vendor VU Vendor Bronze Contributor

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    The MINUTE YOU OPEN A BOTTLE OF PURE NICOTINE YOU ARE CONSIDERED TO BE IN A LEVEL A (RED ZONE)

    CAS #:
    54-11-5

    RTECS #: QS5250000

    UN #: 1654 (Guide 151)

    Common Names:

    • 1-Methyl-2-(3-pyridyl)pyrrolidine
    • 3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)pyridine
    [​IMG]
    Agent Characteristics
    • APPEARANCE: Colorless to pale yellow, oily liquid that turns brown on exposure to air or light. Also available as a powder.
    • DESCRIPTION: Nicotine is a naturally occurring toxic chemical found in tobacco plants. It has a fishy odor when warm. Cigarettes, cigars, other tobacco products, and tobacco smoke contain nicotine. Worker exposure may occur during processing and extraction of tobacco. At one time, nicotine was used in the United States as an insecticide and fumigant; however, it is no longer produced or used in this country for this purpose. Nicotine affects the nervous system and the heart. Exposure to relatively small amounts can rapidly be fatal.
    • METHODS OF DISSEMINATION:
      • Indoor Air: Nicotine can be released into indoor air as a fine powder or liquid spray (aerosol).
      • Water: Nicotine can be used to contaminate water.
      • Food: Nicotine can be used to contaminate food.
      • Outdoor Air: Nicotine can be released into outdoor air as a fine powder or liquid spray (aerosol).
      • Agricultural: If nicotine is released into the air as fine powder or liquid spray (aerosol), it has the potential to contaminate agricultural products.
    • ROUTES OF EXPOSURE: Nicotine can be absorbed into the body by inhalation, ingestion, skin contact, and mucous membranes.
    [​IMG]
    Personal Protective Equipment
    • GENERAL INFORMATION: First Responders should use a NIOSH-certified Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear (CBRN) Self Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) with a Level A protective suit when entering an area with an unknown contaminant or when entering an area where the concentration of the contaminant is unknown. Level A protection should be used until monitoring results confirm the contaminant and the concentration of the contaminant.
      NOTE: Safe use of protective clothing and equipment requires specific skills developed through training and experience.


    • LEVEL A: (RED ZONE): Select when the greatest level of skin, respiratory, and eye protection is required. This is the maximum protection for workers in danger of exposure to unknown chemical hazards or levels above the IDLH or greater than the AEGL-2.
      • A NIOSH-certified CBRN full-face-piece SCBA operated in a pressure-demand mode or a pressure-demand supplied air hose respirator with an auxiliary escape bottle.
      • A Totally-Encapsulating Chemical Protective (TECP) suit that provides protection against CBRN agents.
      • Chemical-resistant gloves (outer).
      • Chemical-resistant gloves (inner).
      • Chemical-resistant boots with a steel toe and shank.
      • Coveralls, long underwear, and a hard hat worn under the TECP suit are optional items.


    • LEVEL B: (RED ZONE): Select when the highest level of respiratory protection is necessary but a lesser level of skin protection is required. This is the minimum protection for workers in danger of exposure to unknown chemical hazards or levels above the IDLH or greater than AEGL-2. It differs from Level A in that it incorporates a non-encapsulating, splash-protective, chemical-resistant splash suit that provides Level A protection against liquids but is not airtight.
      • A NIOSH-certified CBRN full-face-piece SCBA operated in a pressure-demand mode or a pressure-demand supplied air hose respirator with an auxiliary escape bottle.
      • A hooded chemical-resistant suit that provides protection against CBRN agents.
      • Chemical-resistant gloves (outer).
      • Chemical-resistant gloves (inner).
      • Chemical-resistant boots with a steel toe and shank.
      • Coveralls, long underwear, a hard hat worn under the chemical-resistant suit, and chemical-resistant disposable boot-covers worn over the chemical-resistant suit are optional items.
    • LEVEL C: (YELLOW ZONE): Select when the contaminant and concentration of the contaminant are known and the respiratory protection criteria factors for using Air Purifying Respirators (APR) or Powered Air Purifying Respirators (PAPR) are met. This level is appropriate when decontaminating patient/victims.
      • A NIOSH-certified CBRN tight-fitting APR with a canister-type gas mask or CBRN PAPR for air levels greater than AEGL-2.
      • A NIOSH-certified CBRN PAPR with a loose-fitting face-piece, hood, or helmet and a filter or a combination organic vapor, acid gas, and particulate cartridge/filter combination or a continuous flow respirator for air levels greater than AEGL-1.
      • A hooded chemical-resistant suit that provides protection against CBRN agents.
      • Chemical-resistant gloves (outer).
      • Chemical-resistant gloves (inner).
      • Chemical-resistant boots with a steel toe and shank.
      • Escape mask, face shield, coveralls, long underwear, a hard hat worn under the chemical-resistant suit, and chemical-resistant disposable boot-covers worn over the chemical-resistant suit are optional items.
    • LEVEL D: (GREEN ZONE): Select when the contaminant and concentration of the contaminant are known and the concentration is below the appropriate occupational exposure limit or less than AEGL-1 for the stated duration times.
      • Limited to coveralls or other work clothes, boots, and gloves.
     
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  3. Vaperstek

    Vaperstek Founding Vendor Founding Vendor VU Vendor Bronze Contributor

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    And don't forget to go down to your local firefighter station and TELL them what you have in your home, garage, whatever, otherwise you put them AND YOUR NEIGHBORS in A
    DANGEROUS / DEADLY SITUATION!!!!!!





    [​IMG]
    Emergency Response





      • CHEMICAL DANGERS:
        • Nicotine decomposes on heating, producing nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and other highly toxic fumes.
        • Nicotine reacts violently with strong oxidants.
        • Nicotine is incompatible with strong acids
        • Nicotine will attack some forms of plastics, rubber, and coatings.
      • EXPLOSION HAZARDS:
        • Above 203°F (95°C), explosive vapor/air mixtures may be formed.
        • Lower explosive (flammable) limit in air (LEL), 0.7%; upper explosive (flammable) limit in air (UEL), 4.0%.
        • Containers may explode when heated.
      • FIRE FIGHTING INFORMATION:
        • Nicotine is combustible when exposed to heat or flame.
        • Fire will produce irritating, corrosive, and/or toxic gases.
        • For small fires, use dry chemical, carbon dioxide, or water spray.
        • For large fires, use water spray, fog, or regular foam. Move containers from the fire area if it is possible to do so without risk to personnel. Dike fire control water for later disposal; do not scatter the material. Use water spray or fog; do not use straight streams.
        • For fire involving tanks or car/trailer loads, fight the fire from maximum distance or use unmanned hose holders or monitor nozzles. Do not get water inside containers. Cool containers with flooding quantities of water until well after the fire is out. Withdraw immediately in case of rising sound from venting safety devices or discoloration of tanks. Always stay away from tanks engulfed in fire.
        • For massive fire, use unmanned hose holders or monitor nozzles; if this is impossible, withdraw from the area and let the fire burn.
        • Run-off from fire control or dilution water may be corrosive and/or toxic, and it may cause pollution.
        • If the situation allows, control and properly dispose of run-off (effluent).
      • INITIAL ISOLATION AND PROTECTIVE ACTION DISTANCES:
        • If a tank, rail car, or tank truck is involved in a fire, isolate it for 0.5 mi (800 m) in all directions; also consider initial evacuation for 0.5 mi (800 m) in all directions.
        • This agent is not included in the DOT ERG 2004 Table of Initial Isolation and Protective Action Distances.
        • In the DOT ERG 2004 orange-bordered section of the guidebook, there are public safety recommendations to isolate a nicotine (Guide 151) spill or leak area immediately for at least 150 ft (50 m) for liquids and 75 ft (25 m) for solids in all directions.
      • PHYSICAL DANGERS:
        • At 68°F (20°C) evaporation of nicotine can quickly cause hazardous air conditions in small enclosed spaces.
        • Nicotine readily absorbs moisture from the air (hygroscopic).
        • Nicotine is light sensitive (photosensitive) and will gradually turn brown on exposure to air or light.
      • NFPA 704 Signal:
        • Health: 4
        • Flammability: 1
        • Reactivity: 0
        • Special:
        [​IMG]


    Signs/Symptoms



      • TIME COURSE: Nicotine poisoning typically (but not always) produces toxicity in two phases: stimulation/excitation (early) followed quickly by inhibition/depression (late). Some patient/victims may only exhibit late phase effects. Onset of physical effects is dependent on route of exposure. Early phase findings occur within 15 minutes to 1 hour. Vomiting is the most common symptom of nicotine poisoning. Late phase findings occur within 30 minutes to 4 hours. The duration of symptoms is about 1 to 2 hours following mild exposure, and up to 18 to 24 hours following severe exposure. Death may occur within 1 hour after severe exposure.
      • EFFECTS OF SHORT-TERM (LESS THAN 8-HOURS) EXPOSURE: At low concentrations, nicotine causes tremor and increases in heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and level of alertness. More severe exposures cause muscle fasciculations (involuntary twitching), seizures, and abnormal heart rhythms; these effects are followed by multi-system organ depression including slow heart rate (bradycardia), low blood pressure (hypotension), and paralysis of the muscles that control breathing. Vomiting occurs in more then 50% of symptomatic patient/victims. Death may occur, and is typically due to paralysis of the muscles that control breathing, a build-up of fluid in the airways (bronchorrhea), and failure of the heart and blood vessels (cardiovascular collapse).
      • EYE EXPOSURE:
        • Irritation and redness.
        • Pure nicotine in the eye may cause severe pain and inflammation of the conjuctiva.
        • Severe exposure may cause opacification of the cornea.
      • INGESTION EXPOSURE:
        • Early phase: nausea, vomiting (emesis), abdominal pain, and increased salivation; fluid build-up in the airways (bronchorrhea); rapid, heavy breathing (hyperpnea); high blood pressure (hypertension), rapid heart rate (tachycardia), and generalized narrowing of the blood vessels (vasoconstriction) with pale skin; and headache, dizziness, confusion, agitation, restlessness, loss of balance and difficulty walking, and visual and hearing (auditory) distortions.
        • Late phase: diarrhea (particularly at larger doses); shallow breathing (hypoventilation), no breathing (apnea), low blood pressure (hypotension), slow heart rate (bradycardia), abnormal heart rhythms (dysrhythmias), and shock (critically low blood pressure); and loss of normal reflexes (hyporeflexia), loss of normal muscle tone (hypotonia), lethargy, weakness, paralysis, and coma (long-term loss of consciousness).
        • Possible burning sensation in the mouth, throat, and stomach.
        • Absorption of nicotine by ingestion is not complete because acid in the stomach prevents nicotine from being very well absorbed.
      • INHALATION EXPOSURE:
        • See Ingestion Exposure.
      • SKIN EXPOSURE:
        • Irritation and redness (erythema).
        • Occupational handling of tobacco leaves may result in green tobacco sickness caused by dermal absorption of nicotine.
        • Absorption through the skin and particularly through the mucous membranes may result in whole-body (systemic) toxicity.
        • Some patient/victims may exhibit an allergic reaction to nicotine.
        • See Ingestion Exposure.


    Decontamination



      • INTRODUCTION: The purpose of decontamination is to make an individual and/or their equipment safe by physically removing toxic substances quickly and effectively. Care should be taken during decontamination, because absorbed agent can be released from clothing and skin as a gas. Your Incident Commander will provide you with decontaminants specific for the agent released or the agent believed to have been released.
      • DECONTAMINATION CORRIDOR: The following are recommendations to protect the first responders from the release area:
        • Position the decontamination corridor upwind and uphill of the hot zone. The warm zone should include two decontamination corridors. One decontamination corridor is used to enter the warm zone and the other for exiting the warm zone into the cold zone. The decontamination zone for exiting should be upwind and uphill from the zone used to enter.
        • Decontamination area workers should wear appropriate PPE. See the PPE section of this card for detailed information.
        • A solution of detergent and water (which should have a pH value of at least 8 but should not exceed a pH value of 10.5) should be available for use in decontamination procedures. Soft brushes should be available to remove contamination from the PPE. Labeled, durable 6-mil polyethylene bags should be available for disposal of contaminated PPE.
      • INDIVIDUAL DECONTAMINATION: The following methods can be used to decontaminate an individual:
        • Decontamination of First Responder:
          • Begin washing PPE of the first responder using soap and water solution and a soft brush. Always move in a downward motion (from head to toe). Make sure to get into all areas, especially folds in the clothing. Wash and rinse (using cold or warm water) until the contaminant is thoroughly removed.
          • Remove PPE by rolling downward (from head to toe) and avoid pulling PPE off over the head. Remove the SCBA after other PPE has been removed.
          • Place all PPE in labeled durable 6-mil polyethylene bags.
        • Decontamination of Patient/Victim:
          • Remove the patient/victim from the contaminated area and into the decontamination corridor.
          • Remove all clothing (at least down to their undergarments) and place the clothing in a labeled durable 6-mil polyethylene bag.
          • Thoroughly wash and rinse (using cold or warm water) the contaminated skin of the patient/victim using a soap and water solution. Be careful not to break the patient/victim’s skin during the decontamination process, and cover all open wounds.
          • Cover the patient/victim to prevent shock and loss of body heat.
          • Move the patient/victim to an area where emergency medical treatment can be provided.
     
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