Kanger SSOCC Teardown

Discussion in '"How To" - Rebuilding Tutorials' started by Lost, Dec 21, 2015.

  1. Lost

    Lost Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    Learning to rebuild these will need to be a group effort. I had one to play with... but destroyed it in the process of figuring out how to get it apart.

    Related comments are below each pic.

    SSOCC Full.jpg
    Pic 1: The whole atty
    I didn't get the coil out successfully when removing the firing pin and grommet. Some of the coil came out with it and unraveled.

    As far as I could reconstruct, the inside diameter (ID) is 4mm with 8 wraps. The wire is .36mm which puts it at 27 gauge. Approx 14.5mm of wire. Obviously, the ID and wraps are subject to change.

    I've heard two YouTube reviewers give different descriptions of the wire in these things. Once said stainless steel. The other said stainless-coated nickel. Both apparently got this info from Kanger. I contacted Kanger over a month ago, and have not heard back. Because... Kanger.

    1. Locate the ends of the wires. At the top of the photo is the firing pin and grommet. Look just under the grommet, at the far left side. There's a notch. That's where one of wires sits. There's another on the other side. When you pull these two pieces out, keep your fingernails away from the wires.

    2. Get your nails under the firing pin ONLY and pull slowly. Wiggle a bit if necessary.

    3. Gently work out the grommet. Yeah, it's a pain.


    SSOCC No Grommet.jpg
    PIC 2: My stupidity is showing
    This is the clean atty, without the firing pin, the grommet and the coil/cotton. I can't show you a photo of the coil/cotton, because I threw away the unraveled parts a few weeks ago. Because I'm an idiot.

    People will look at this and think it's one piece. It's actually two. The telling sign is just to the left of that silicone O ring. See that notch? Bingo.

    4. Keep the coil/cotton in place.

    5. Remove the O ring if you want, but you can leave it in place as well.

    For the next pic, you'll need to know what the "top" and "bottom" are. The "top" of the atty is the "sleeve"... the hollow piece that allows you to look inside when it's assembled. The "bottom" is where the firing pin and grommet were, and where the O ring sits in the photo.


    SSOCC Tap Out Sleeve.jpg
    Pic 3: Why I hate disposable attys
    I tried twisting the sleeve and bottom apart. The bottom broke into pieces. This is because pressure holding the two pieces together is stronger than the metal. Anyone who has rebuilt older versions of Kanger attys knows what I'm talking about.

    6. Get something that will grip the top part of the sleeve. That strange contraption in the photo is a fencing pliers, which is 100% perfect for removing sleeves from Kanger attys. Or just use any stupid grabby thing.

    7. TAP the bottom out. You do this by getting a micro screwdriver (I used a 3mm version) and putting it down inside the atty, making sure it touches the side/edge. Now get a rubber mallet and gently tap the screwdriver, forcing the bottom piece out of the sleeve.

    The photo shows the sleeve and (broken) bottom piece almost completely separated. You will wish you had three hands for this. I held the fencing pliers with my feet.


    SSOCC Pieces.jpg
    Pic 4: Everything but the firing pin and grommet
    The two pieces on the left are destroyed pieces of the bottom that snapped off. The piece on the right is the sleeve.

    The glorious piece in the middle is what you're going to rebuild on. With the sleeve off, you should be able to stick a vertical coil in there.

    8. Start figuring out how to rebuild these things.

    What I need from extremely helpful people
    --Pics of the coil and the cotton bacon surrounding it, hopefully intact.
    --An idea of where they sat in that middle piece. If you can tap out of the sleeve with the coil/cotton still sitting perfectly, all the better.
    --Any clue of what wicking might be inside the coil, not just the bacon surrounding it.

    Thanks.
     
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  2. Vapomizer

    Vapomizer Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    First impressions, 27 gauge SS 316L can not stay at 0.5 Ohm when wrapped 8 times with a 4mm ID, according to Steam-Engine one needs to go up to 26 gauge and wrap with a 3mm ID which should be optimal since i do not think we can tightly fit the cotton bacon wick as factory so that extra 1mm outer space could come handy and should not effect the inner airflow a lot.

    I believe we do not need to know the exact alloy of the original wire as the SS 316L is being used successfully in the Crown tank, so it seems this material is good enough

    Could you please illustrate this step with a picture by just loosely putting the parts again together and illustrating the correct placement of the screw driver as best as you can?

    I will attempt tearing the SSOCC apart after i receive my replacement factory coil head, will take as many pictures and measurements as possible (i have a long list of what to record during every step of the "reverse-engineering" process) while preserving every part of the factory parts in original condition for inner inspection, i would only like from you to illustrate with pictures the best practices of taking this apart non-destructively, like exact places and force to hold the two pieces and exact placement of screw driver when pushing the inner part out

    Thank you so much for this effort, it is really great that you got this started.
     
  3. Vapomizer

    Vapomizer Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    ok after carefully inspecting the two parts taken apart i am having some random semi-practical thoughts

    It seems like you do not need to remove the pin and grommet at all in order to take the outer sleeve out, also you can not hold the atty from the bottom part because it is the weakest part, one needs to perform the whole task without any pressure to the bottom part with the 510 threading, grommet and pin.

    Taking these two parts apart without destroying the coil and wick is a very delicate procedure but one which can be performed with much patience, and the right tools

    One needs to hold the outer sleeve and push out the inner part from places that are stronger than the press fitting pressure, while trying to weaken/lubricate the press fit

    I see a few candidate locations for holding and pushing out the inner part without touching the weak bottom part at all.

    1- To hold the outer sleeve one can either hold it from the inside of the top part that screws on the chimney or through the 1mm outer extension either in the wicking holes or around the notches that marks the separation area between the outer sleeve and inner part, this will require a special tool of course but only the first time when one needs to preserve the coil/wicking construction for further inspection, as for later separation one can just take the coil/wick out first and follow the method you mentioned earlier.

    2- To push the inner part out, one can insert a screw driver at a slight angel in the wicking holes so that it pushes against the inner wicking holes of the inner part, this location is durable and would not effect the overall quality of the shell if the inner wicking holes are scratched wider.

    3- One can pour a few drops of machine oil (or food oil in order to not contaminate the shell for further vaping) in between the press fitted joint between the two inner and outer part after creating a small channel with a screw driver first, i think this will make the two parts quite slippery and easier to separate, Next time you leave it very slightly oiled so it be much easier to take apart for the next rebuild

    Just a few thoughts i had by looking at the pictures, maybe not practical or the right tools do not exist, but if done properly this would be a very nice shell to rebuild comfortably on.

    Anyone that could help suggest the right tools or procedures for combating that press-fitting as neatly as possible would be great.
     
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  4. Vapomizer

    Vapomizer Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    Ok a more mature, easy and practical theory

    SSOCC Pieces.jpg

    1- I see that there is a gap in the inner shell that can be pushed in to separate or create a gap between the inner shell and outer sleeve, i assume that the bottom part (left side in the picture) with the full rounded ring holding the two halves together is the one with the bottom 510, grommet and pin attached to it? looking at my SSOCC i can see the two edges of the two halves of the inner part visible and accessible through the top opening and can be pushed in with a flat blade screw driver


    SSOCC Full.jpg

    2- There are three places where one can push in the inner part using a flat blade screw driver to slightly close the gap between the two inner halves and create a gap between the inner shell and outer sleeve press fitting, while the atty is placed on a table upside down as in the picture to avoid any pressure on the bottom weak part or while fully holding the atty in hand supporting the outer sleeve with hand so that its shape won't change much

    a) going at an angle through the wick holes on both sides,
    b) from the notches on both sides and
    c) through the top opening from both sides

    3- Once the two inner parts have a small gap, one can put a few drops of food oil in between through the different locations used to push in the inner shell.

    4- Once the two parts are slightly separated and oiled one can screw the 510 thread to the tank base and screw loose or wiggle the outer sleeve out very easily

    That is my theory and the method i will try to to get the inner shell out intact and with the coil/wick fully assembled, i would appreciate any comments on this method

    LostHasher Could you confirm if the inner shell halves can be pressed closer together easily from the top, or how much force is needed to move them closer?
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2015
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  5. Lost

    Lost Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    Running out the door. But yes. And I'll address your other stuff too.
     
  6. dre

    dre Gold Contributor Member For 3 Years ECF Refugee

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    The wire is n80 with ni200 legs

    Sent from my Droid Turbo 2 using Tapatalk
     
  7. Vapomizer

    Vapomizer Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    Forget the first two posts, probably a waste of space, the last post with the commented pictures is what matters, and the question about the malleability of the inner shell, this is where you need to focus your reading/testing :)
     
  8. Vapomizer

    Vapomizer Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    How did you find that out?
     
  9. dre

    dre Gold Contributor Member For 3 Years ECF Refugee

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    I've taken one apart

    Sent from my Droid Turbo 2 using Tapatalk
     
  10. Vapomizer

    Vapomizer Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    Any tips about a non-destructive method of doing so? :)
     
  11. dre

    dre Gold Contributor Member For 3 Years ECF Refugee

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    Haven't figured it out yet. The old square heads were easier all you did is pop the top off and re coil it.

    Sent from my Droid Turbo 2 using Tapatalk
     
  12. Vapomizer

    Vapomizer Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    Yup, but if my theory is applicable, taking an SSOCC apart could be very easy, i try tomorrow if i receive my replacement coil in the mail
     
  13. Lost

    Lost Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    Wow @Vapomizer, you are one motivated bastard. Vapomotivated.

    --Technically, you are correct. You should be able to leave the pin and grommet in place while popping out the inner sleeve.

    --Regarding your pic with the red arrow and the question mark... yes, that's where the broken threads go. You'll have to use the pic of the fully assembled SSOCC and use some imagination.

    --You're thinking way too hard about removing that thing. We've already established how to pop it out, and have graduated to coil building. Save your brain power. But to clarify the removal, here's some visual stimulation.

    SSOCC Side by Side.jpg


    SSOCC Top View.jpg

    SSOCC Measurement ID 7mm.jpg

    That's about all the info I can supply. Going to hold off on the coil part until I can see a clean removal.
     
  14. Vapomizer

    Vapomizer Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    We have not graduated quite yet, you requested a clean removal and in order to do that i can not use your "tap from the inside" removal method because then i risk messing up the coil/wick inside by inserting the screw driver through the top hole and all the way to the bottom edge of the inner shell

    I need to try my method of "all external removal" i just need your help with finding out how malleable the internal shell's halves are and how easily can they be pressed closer together, so that i can push them in and then screw open the outer sleeve with the internals intact so that i can take the pictures you want to figure out coil/wick exact placement

    Would you help me with that final part? :)
     
  15. Lost

    Lost Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    There's no malleability. I get what you're trying to do, and it would be great if it could work, but it won't.

    You can mess up the coil a bit. It'll be fine. And not the platitude-type "it will be fine." Anything you get out of there will be good enough.

    I fully acknowledge that I could simply steal my wife's single clean SSOCC atty and take it apart. There's a giant problem with that... spousal harmony. That's currently her only backup Nebox atty in case the RBA fails. And here's the important part: Wife + her first RBA = no more microsurgery to rebuild these stupid disposable Kanger attys. @OBDave If anything, I'll buy two more RBAs and have those wicked and ready as backup.
     
  16. Vapomizer

    Vapomizer Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    hahaha, oh no, we do not want to mess up your spousal harmony over a stupid disposable atty, do we? i just received my factory replacement head in the mail and the stupid shop has sent me the 1.2 Ohm head instead of the 0.5 Ohm i ordered, on top of that, my freaking SSOCC still working great after over 2 weeks of vaping so it is a tricky situation i am in.

    I will wait until my SSOCC start tasting weird and then replace it with the 1.2 Ohms head and take it apart using your "internal TAP method" don't blame me if i send you messed up pictures of the internals ... remember that you said "it will be fine" :)
     
  17. OBDave

    OBDave VU Donator Gold Contributor Member For 3 Years

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    For similar reasons as @LostHasher I'm not about to steal any good coils to destroy in the name of science - but Mrs. Dave should be burning up a coil pretty soon, I'll try to snag the spoiled one and attempt the deconstruction as proposed...
     
  18. Lost

    Lost Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    Mrs. Lost got a kick out of the fact there's a Mrs. Dave. The Nebox Wives, bogarting attys and stifling science.
     
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  19. Vapomizer

    Vapomizer Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    Ok, i finally did it, this post is going to be long with many pictures (the max 10 pics per post allowed by the forum), i fully reverse engineered that coil head and collected all the information to be collected about it so lets get started.

    First taking this atty apart is very simple when done right, and it is the same exact method you would use with the V.OCC V.2 squared atty as well, here is the simplest tear-down method (sorry i did not take pictures for that part but it is rather easy to perform)

    First remove the rubber grommet and connection pin so that the rubber would not get damaged during this process and to allow the tip of the screw driver to exit from the other side.

    1- Get a 2.5mm screw driver (the traditional silver one with the 4.5mm neck) and wrap it with ONLY ONE LAYER of electrical tape so that it fits in the top opening without ruining the ring around the top opening of the outer sleeve which connects with the chimney, but would press against the coil+wick inside, the electrical tape wrapping would make it stick to the coil and prevent the metal from damaging the inner sleeve.

    2- Insert the screw driver all the way in until its NECK presses against the coil, now inside the inner sleeve the coil will be compressed and pushed against the cotton wrap and the cotton will be pressed against the inner of the sleeve, the screw driver will have no where to escape unless the entire inner sleeve comes out

    3- Now turn the entire thing upside down with the screw driver pressed against a hard surface like a wooden table or the floor, get pliers and wrap it in electrical tape as well for the same purpose explained above, wrap the atty in paper towel and hold it with the pliers the paper towel will get compressed inside the wicking holes providing a strong grip, tap the pliers gently but firmly with something heavy few times and the outer sleeve will be separated from the inner sleeve and can be easily removed

    4- All the damage that this method would cause is that the coil inside would be compressed but we do not care about that anyways because we are replacing it

    Here is the end result, both sleeves are intact and in a perfect condition after using this removal method, no scratches, broken parts, or anything like that.

    DSC_0143.JPG

    Here is how it is factory-installed inside the inner sleeve, this sleeve has a 7mm ID, the coil ID is 4mm and the cotton thickness is 3mm (more on cotton thickness later)

    DSC_0150.JPG
    DSC_0151.JPG

    The coil after taken out, wrapped in cotton

    DSC_0156.JPG

    It is wrapped in two sheets of 7mm X 22mm Japanese cotton as shown in the picture, the sheets are only wrapped ONCE, i did not cut them out, this is how they actually are after folding them out gently

    DSC_0157.JPG

    and here is how they look from the other side

    Otherside.jpg

    This with outer sheet separated, the outer sheet facing the wicking holes is the ticker one with 2mm of thickness, the sheet wrapped around the coil itself which is working as an insulator to the negative wire is 1mm in thickness, both have a total of 3mm in thickness

    Seperated.jpg

    The wick sheets width against the wicking holes, they are 7mm wide which happens to also be the height of the coil wrapped inside it covers about 2mm above and 2mm below the wicking holes

    WickWidth.jpg

    Now i have probably pulled about two wraps of the coil while taking this thing apart, but here is the naked coil inside

    NakedCoil1.jpg

    NakedCoil2.jpg

    Now this coil appears to be using 28 gauge wire of SOME SORT, wrapped 10 wraps around 4mm ID, how can they reach the resistance of 0.5 Ohm with 10 wraps of 28 gauge wire with a 4mm ID is beyond me, even if they use legs with ZERO resistance they can not achieve this resistance with any known vaping material with a single round coil!

    I wish someone can provide some input in this matter

    That was long but here you have it @LostHasher as promised, i have already ordered 26 gauge Stainless Steel 316L to rebuild that damn thing, but i can not make as many wraps and stay at 0.5 to 0.6 ohm, my max wraps with 4mm ID would be 6 and with 3.5mm ID would be 7, for a 0.6 ohm resistance.

    OUT!
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2016
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  20. Lost

    Lost Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    Nice work, detective.

    --Measure the wire again. It's .36 mm, which would put it at 27g.

    --That doesn't look like 10 wraps. Not even close. But if you want 10 wraps, and have room for them...

    --Titanium, 26g, 4mm ID, 10 wrap, .57 ohm... at least in theory.

    --For the SSOCC .15 version...
    Ni200, 27g, 4mm ID, 10 wrap, .144ohm... again, in theory.

    Just started playing with TC-approved wire a few days ago. I apparently hit a home run with the Ti build in her RBA, so she's bogarting the remaining SSOCC (.15) for an emergency.
     
  21. Vapomizer

    Vapomizer Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    It was 10 tightly spaced wraps, you can count 8 wraps in the picture and i pulled out about two wraps while getting the thing out, so it was definitely 9 or 10 wraps

    Wait a minute here, that wire is a power mode wire not an ultra low resistance Ti or Ni, i have been using it in power mode all that time, the wires you mentioned are TC only wires, also many sources mention the wire is Nichrome (i think also in Kanger official site), how can a 27g Nichrome 9 or 10 wraps with a 4mm ID comes down to 0.5 ohm? can anyone explain that before i start pulling my hair?

    since we now know everything about the SSOCC i would re-build it with Ti anyways :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2016
  22. Lost

    Lost Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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  23. Vapomizer

    Vapomizer Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    Yes i am aware of that composition and yes i was talking about Ni200, what i meant is, in your examples where you demonstrate how a 10 wraps single coil can be 0.5 or 0.15 ohms you use TC-ONLY wires in your examples, BUT the coil we are talking about that was factory installed in the SSOCC is a power-mode coil, and when i said that there is no known material that could go down to 0.5 ohm with 10 wraps of 28g and 4mm ID, i was referring to power-mode materials.

    So my question stands, what material (used for power mode) would provide 0.5 ohm resistance when a 28g wire is wrapped 10 times with 4mm ID? :)

    Keep in mind that is around 150 mm resistance wire length, so to re-phrase, what 28g 150 mm long wire will have the resistance of 0.5 and can be used in power mode?

    Good finding, i still believe that the wire in the SSOCC is 27g not 28g regardless of what LostHasher said :D
     
  24. Lost

    Lost Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    I think there's a typo in there somewhere. Because...

    Moving on...

    I'm actually surprised you didn't dig this up on the interwebs during your down time. You're also probably assuming things about the SSOCCs that maybe you shouldn't. Why can't you use a Ni/SS/Ti wire in power-only mode? Pretty sure that's possible. (I should know that definitively, but don't.)

    My mindset regarding all this:
    1. I don't like having a bunch of extra wire types sitting around.
    2. I would only rebuild the SSOCCs for my wife, and she uses TC.
    3. I wanted a single wire for anything TC and picked Ti.
    4. Since I got her RBA taken care of, and am getting a second one as backup, I decided to break apart the SSOCC to pass along knowledge that seemed to be missing.
    5. I gave up trying to find out what magic wire is in that .5 SSOCC. Because of #s 1-4. And because my quest for sanity is greater than my quest for this elusive knowledge. The answers I've received from vendor webpages include: Nichrome, SS, Kanthal, SS-coated nickel, nickel-coated SS, and one more I can't remember. Oh, and Kanger didn't get back to me. Surprise.

    Extra credit:
    6. I might not have mentioned this here before, but I hate hate hate Kanger. Because the amount of hate a person has for Kanger is directly proportionate to the amount of time they deal with Kanger products.
    Latest example: Her Nebox chewed up her new Samsung batt. But hey, ANYTHING to get her vaping with an RBA.
     
  25. Zr0

    Zr0 Member For 2 Years

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    Wait I thought that the "SS" in "SSOCC" stood for Stainless Steel, as in stainless steel coil wire!?
     
  26. Lost

    Lost Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    Oh sorry... I do remember reading the warnings about all that.


    In name and in theory, yes. But there's just so much disagreement as to what exactly that wire is. Kanger has even told reviewers different things, or made their explanation so confusing, the reviewers didn't "translate" it right. The only thing I know (almost) for certain is that there's nickel in the .15 coil.

    I will have to admit though... those attys last a long freaking time. So does the RBA. Either it's the TC wire, the TC mode, or the combo. Wow. (I've rebuilt more than 150 kanthal coils for the old-style Kanger attys, with various gauges/wraps/wicking.) Definitely a difference.
     
  27. Zr0

    Zr0 Member For 2 Years

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    What... That's the whole reason I picked some up, to vape in ss tc mode on my vtc (which works btw) so... If it's not stainless steel what the hell am I vaping on?!
     
  28. Zr0

    Zr0 Member For 2 Years

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    I meant my .5 ohm ssoc coil works in ss tc mode on my vtc mini. Reads as .6 ohms hits protection like it should.
     

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  29. Vapomizer

    Vapomizer Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    I rebuilt the SSOCC with Stainless Steel 316L 26ga and it is performing much better than factory coil, huge dense vapor production, flavor is at least 2 if not 3 times better, it can handle a lot more wattage, and guess what it can work in TC mode (i have not tried TC yet because i am waiting for my TC mod to arrive)

    Really easy to take apart and re-press fit once you get the hang of it, i am loving the experience, thanks to everyone who helped with this especially @LostHasher
     
  30. dre

    dre Gold Contributor Member For 3 Years ECF Refugee

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    Im almost certain its 26g n80 4 wraps and the rest is ni200

    Sent from my Droid Turbo 2 using Tapatalk
     
  31. Lost

    Lost Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    I want to wonder where that chart came from.
    Maybe I should just be happy there's a chart.
     
  32. kim leith

    kim leith Member For 1 Year

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    Seems like a lot of effort for a 3 or 4 dollar item. Just sayin.
     
  33. Lost

    Lost Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    It's money. I was rebuilding at least five Protank/EVOD attys a week. Adds up.

    It's also a stubborn refusal to dispose of something rebuildable, especially when you can do it while watching TV.

    And it's what @Jim_MDP mentioned... you have more control over what you throw in your tank. Wire, ohms and wicking. Those Protank attys have crap silica in them. Rebuilds were cotton.

    One more item of note... this started in another thread, where we were halfway shocked no one had torn one of these apart yet, at least to our knowledge. This is just what happens. Not too common here on VU, but yeah, semi-typical electronics teardown discussion.
     
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  34. Lost

    Lost Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    Loving my wife's new 100% RBA lifestyle. Slammed out 12 coils last night; that's three months worth. Getting a backup RBA for each tank, so I can have one always wicked and ready to go. Sweet.
     
  35. kim leith

    kim leith Member For 1 Year

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    Ya knowing "exactly" the type of wick and wire that's in your device for safety/flavor reasons makes sense.
    Just got a SSOCC for my Kanger Mini. Tastes great after updating my RX200. Just not sure what type of SS is.
    304 maybe? Will try some of the "cleaning" methods I've heard of to get the most life out of it.
     
  36. Lost

    Lost Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    Last edited: Jan 24, 2016
  37. Vapomizer

    Vapomizer Silver Contributor Member For 1 Year

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    Money adds up yes, but it is not only about that, I have made many different build types in that SSOCC with different IDs, wraps and resistance, i was able to use it in TC mode before the official SUS316 was out, and the one i rebuild provides much better flavor and vapor than the stock, twice better at least, it is also a lot of fun to do, like Lost says, while watching TV, and you would not have to vape it until it dies, i re-build it when i just get bored of it, just take it apart, put new cotton and wire inside, tinkering is so enjoyable for some, myself included.

    One drawback though is that the Stock atty uses nonresistance-resistance-nonresistance wire which preserves the rubber insulator, when this thing is re-built with normal all-resistive wire, the rubber insulator starts melting on anything above 50 Watts, i keep my rebuild within these limits, 7 wraps well spaced of 26g SS316, take about 45W and produces HUGE clouds that suck my tank dry very fast :)
     
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  38. jacobkammerer

    jacobkammerer New Member

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    You guys made soo hard on yourselves just put a small drill bit through the holes at the bottom of the 510 and pliers at the top and pull pop it goes!!!

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk
     
  39. jacobkammerer

    jacobkammerer New Member

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    Oooops nvm lol

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk
     
  40. kim leith

    kim leith Member For 1 Year

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    Glad for the "Vape Tweekers" out there doing all the R&D. The nonresistance wire find was BIG. Keeping it safe is a must for us.
     
  41. Yoritana

    Yoritana New Member

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    I've been fiddling with the new SSOCC atomizer heads for a few weeks now, here's what I've learned.
    Mind you, these are the new (v2?) SSOCC. The first version, the one the OP has pictured has a lip/bevel/reduction at the top, where as these new ones have an outer shell that is the same diameter all the way up.

    My tear down technique is to attach the atomizer to the base of the tank, and the tank to the mod (you need a lot to hold on to), then I wrap the head in something soft like a paper towel, and grip it with some channel locks. Then it's just a matter of pulling it off straight, because I've slightly bent a few. This works so well because the atomizer shell is more solid at the threads than down at the terminal.

    The coil inside (and this was for a .5 ohm nichrome 80) was 8 spaced wraps of 22 awg at 4mm inner diameter and 7mm in height. I calculated the gauge by measuring the length of the wire which was about 150mm. At that length, the only gauge that works for a .5 ohm resistance in nichrome 80 is 22. Now this coil I had been vaping between 35 and 45 watts, which according to steam-engine is 115-150 heat flux. With the air flow wide open on the subtank mini, it was oh so nice.

    I'm going to try my hand again rebuilding these atties with stainless steel. My first attempts were awful, popped and sizzled and spewed juice to the point that they were unusable. Two mistakes I know I made: I was aiming for sub ohm because I thought that's what I needed even though I've got a regulated mod (silly, right?) any way I didn't get enough wraps and it was just ugly without enough airflow OR surface area. The second mistake was in aiming for a 300 in heat flux. I didn't know I had been vaping at 150mj.

    So these things aren't that hard to rebuild, and I am really liking the vertical coils. The most difficult aspect of getting them together is the wick. I will have to try something new like rolling the top edge to keep it from climbing the top of the coil. I'll report my findings.

    Side notes:
    Having bent a few while taking them apart, I learned that the atomizer heads aren't totally straight out of the package, which caused me to the think the threading was bad when putting the tank together. If the atomizer is slightly crooked, it rubs against the chimney in the top of the tank as you screw the base into the top. A little adjustment using your eyeballs and the rubbing is gone.

    need a better way to rip them apart. two reasons, I like my tank and don't want to tear the threads, and a jig would allow for a straighter pull. The threads are the same spec as 510 which is 7mm X 0.5. UNfortunately, nuts of that size are impossible to find, but people are using 6mm nuts, drilling the existing threads out, and tapping them with the 7x0.5.

    folks at my local B&M say that stainless steel is not good for vaping, too many unknowns, possible lead contamination, and that TC is dangerous and unpredictable. Stick with Kanthal, they say. There's a reason why everyone is using it, they say. I'm throwing caution to the wind on this one.
     
  42. GregC

    GregC New Member

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    I would like to clarify things in this discussion.
    I have a SUBVOD with the Toptank Nano, using the SSOCC NC .5 ohm coils. It can use .5 ohm coils with a max of .4 ohms.
    I switched over from V2 where I was rebuilding coils in those tanks.

    The SSOCC coils I use (with the red cap, which use NiCr 80/20 wire according to KangerTech) have the following:

    Facts; the wire inside the factory tank is approx. 5.76" long (pulled from the first coil I tore apart, the one that came in the unit). I measured it with my micrometer. The wire length I listed is approx cos the wire was not perfectly straight since it was removed after being coiled.

    The wire diameter is NiCr 28 gage, or .3200 mm., with about a 4 mm (3/16") inside diameter wrapped 8 times. Fact: if you ohm this length of wire it will read approx. .5+ ohms. If you have experience with the multi-meter and measuring wire resistance, you know that it is somewhat touchy. Moving the meter lead just a fraction will change the ohm readings a good bit. I ohm this length of wire by attaching leads as close to the ends of the wire as possible and let the wire hang while holding one meter lead.

    Now when I ohm the coil when I removed it, it doesn't read .5 ohms. It read somewhere around .5 to 1 ohm, and I think that was do to slightly moving the coil around while holding the meter leads to it. It's funny, but with your meter leads connected, squeeze the coils length and stretch it out and you can see the resistance change. Longer coil = higher ohms.

    Another interesting this I've found is this. None of the calculators I've tried can compute this coils using the parameters above. One reason is because they all use coil leg lengths in the calculations. These SSOCC coils have 2 different leg lengths. The top leg suns from top of coil wrap to well below the bottom coil wrap and the lower on is the same length as the top one. Confusing.

    I currently have 26 gage NC wire and have tried on rebuild. What I did was just wrap the wire about 6-7 times (trying to keep ohms close to .5) then wrapped the cotton, insert it, then cut the wires to length. Took it back out and it ohm's around .7 - 1 ohm. It fires a little slower of course because the wire I have is larger and has less wraps and ohms are higher. I imagine if I made more wraps it would cloud more, of course the resistance would be higher so it may not work better.

    I wanted to video my complete build but I don't have a way to hold my Galaxy S5..There is a video on this on you tube, made by a Russian guy I think) and at least you can see what he is doing to take the thing apart and rebuild it.

    In a nutshell, the hardest part is pulling the outer sleeve off the coil using pliers. It only takes a fraction of an inch to unseat the outer cover from the inner cover. I did it with the coil screwed into the base, being very careful NOT to break the threads on the coil head.
    There is NO NEED to destroy the coil when pulling it apart. It just takes some umph to pull it apart!

    After the first removal, I did it by putting my 1.4 mm screwdriver thru the end of the coil where the wires come out and used pliers to pull the cover back off. I wouldn't advise this was because it wouldn't be very hard to bend that end of the coils!
     
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  43. GregC

    GregC New Member

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    After days of trying to get these SSOCC coils rebuilt so they heat up as fast as the factory one, I've succeeded!
    The problem I was having was, even using the Steam engine app, the coils kept reading around 1 ohm instead of .5 ohms. Another things I found was many folks saying the factory SSOCC .5 ohm coils have been reading closer to .6+ ohms.

    Anyway, using 146 mm of 28g NC80 wire, it's all about where the wire go thru the device. And to clarify, when you build the coil, the top leg is bent down and extended enough to protrude thru the end of the coil. This will be the negative end. The lower leg will be the positive end, which is the one that is between the red rubber seal and the metal pin.

    Now the problem I was having.
    When you wrap the cotton, it goes under the leg, then completely around the coil and overlaps the leg. The keeps the leg from contacting the sleeve when it put back on.

    **Very important part**
    You would think that this top leg would be ok to touch the casing because this where this ground leg is attached anyway, but it seems to affect the final resistance when it's all put together.
    So when you put the rubber seal and the pin back on, make sure the ground leg is not touching the inside of the casing when it comes out from the coil. This is where I found on mine that if I pushed this wire in a tiny bit so it didn't touch anything except where fits in the little slot under the red rubber gasket, the resistance drops down to around .6 - .7 .

    As well, make sure the bottom leg isn't touching anything either. It's very easy for these 2 legs to touch just under the red seal, or for the bottom leg (positive end) to touch the sides.
     
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  44. charly1954

    charly1954 New Member

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    3/16" drill bit would not fit into my coil but a 5/32 fit snug. 4mm is .1574", 5/32 is .1562", 3/16" is .1875"
    I took my kanger SSOCC apart and laid 32 kanthal next to it, for the experts can you tell what the wire gauge is. As said in post #41, 22g is the only gauge that works for a .5 ohm resistance in nichrome 80 is 22. Now my coil was .6ohms and 23g came out to 8 wraps w/4mm inner ID. Leg lengths don't make much difference, I tried 3 different lengths(1/4",1/2",3/4") and it still quoted 8 wraps, which my coil had 8.

    [​IMG]
    .
     
  45. charly1954

    charly1954 New Member

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    Its easy and you don't destroy the coil wire.

    First get something to run thru the air vents, I used a nail. Being round it would not fit thru the square holes so I ground 2 sides flat. Then I pulled on the cup cover with channelocks and it poped right off. You can leave the coil screwed into the bottom part of the tank, but I didn't want to take the chance in damaging it so I used the nail.

    Also, on another SSOCC I took apart just the end cap came off and the sleeve stayed on. THis was a Kanger too not a clone.

    [​IMG]


    coil completely apart

    [​IMG]
    Coil shows allot of burnt on gunk, only in the middle where the juice enters the feed holes.

    [​IMG]




    Don't know exact size Kanger wraped but this is a 9/64" drill bit

    [​IMG]




    Put on stove flame and burnt off gunk

    [​IMG]




    Coil after fire, very little gunk left. I used a toothbrush to clean it off. Wire came clean like new(didn't add photo of cleaned coil)

    [​IMG]




    Reassemble coil not as pretty as the new ones since I used used cotton but it worked ok.

    [​IMG]




    When new it tested .59ohms, after rebuilding with same wire its .57ohms

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2016
    frak and Lost like this.
  46. GraySY

    GraySY Member For 1 Year

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    Thank you, I have long wanted to find a that manual.
     
  47. charly1954

    charly1954 New Member

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    In the photo above that shows channellocks be careful not to pull just the end cap off leaving the sleeve. If you pull the cap off you can deform the sleeve trying to get it off. If the cap comes off put it back on then make sure the teeth of the channellocks are gripping the holes in the sleeve, that way they both come off.

    I have repadded my coils several times each using the wire in the coil. On mine the inner 2-3 wraps are soidered to other wire, I think this is how they get the ohms so low. I tried making new coils but I could not get the ohms down to .5 - .6 so I simply reuse the wire coil. I burn the gunk off before I repad them with japan flat cotton.

    When reusing the wire coil run a drill bit thru it so the wire is held in position. Its not easy to instal since the wire ends are already cut to length but it can be done
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2016
  48. GraySY

    GraySY Member For 1 Year

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    @charly1954 Good advice! I also failed to make a new proper coil.
    It`s good news I'm not thrown out the old. I their glowing, clean and try to put it back with new japan flat cotton.
     
  49. frak

    frak New Member

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    Hi,

    Could you elaborate a little more on how you clean the cotton off of the coil, and how you re-assemble? This is my first vape, and throwing out the coils is killing me - it seems such a waste.

    Thanks!
     
  50. Jevz

    Jevz New Member

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    Hey man i have a quick question i'm using SS 316L wire, can you tell me what would be the best build to vape to vape at .5 or .6 ohms. I'm using coil master version 4 i see here you said 7 wells spaced wraps of 26g SS316 but you didn't say at what size, So can you please Clarify this for me please. I hate the taste of kanthal
     

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