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A Spin Off of Keep a Word/Drop a Word and Music, Pics, and Whatnot

Bliss Doubt

Platinum Contributor
Member For 5 Years
Thank you my Dear Friend, she wont use anything that the quack (so called doctor) doesn't tell her to :( .

Oil of oregano is just a supplement. If you could eat enough oregano plant, it would be the same, but nobody wants to eat that much. Doctors usually have nothing to say about supps, except "pshaw" (with an eye roll). The 20th century brought us harsh, dangerous drugs and treatments, getting even worse in the 21st century, while eons old natural cures are off the official shelves.
 

gopher_byrd

Cranky Old Fart
VU Donator
Diamond Contributor
ECF Refugee
Member For 5 Years
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But more TV viewers = more advertising revenue. I don't know whether that would benefit the WNBA, or just the TV network or station. Don't they put up advertising signs all around the playing field too?
The blackout stuff is all based on actual attendance. NFL games are blacked out unless they are sold out within a certain time period before the game. I'm not sure how NBA/WNBA rules work. I agree that one would think more eyeballs = more ad money.
 

SirKadly

Squonk 'em if you got 'em
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Platinum Contributor
Member For 5 Years
So I looked it up. Interestingly enough it was supposedly written with Aretha in mind, but Atlantic Records decided it would be a good song for Dusty Springfield's first album with them. Aretha's recording came a year later.
 

Bliss Doubt

Platinum Contributor
Member For 5 Years
Not sure who did this song originally without researching it, but I love Aretha's singing so I'm posting her version.

Son of a Preacher Man - Aretha Franklin

Wiki sez:

In 1968, songwriters John Hurley and Ronnie Wilkins (who had recently had a hit with "Love of the Common People") wrote the song with Aretha Franklin in mind, according to a 2009 interview with Wilkins. Atlantic Records producer and co-owner Jerry Wexler, who was recording Dusty Springfield's first Atlantic album in Memphis at the time, liked the song and suggested it to Springfield for the Dusty in Memphis album.[3]

Following Springfield's top-10 single release, the song was recorded in 1969 by Franklin for her This Girl's in Love with You album. Franklin's version also appeared as the B-side of her hit single "Call Me". Franklin's older sister Erma Franklin also recorded the song and included it on her 1969 Brunswick album Soul Sister.
 

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