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Vaping ruined my Macbooks!

How does anyone solve this issue besides the "don't vape around your computer". I have three totally dead Macbooks when opened up looks like someone just gave them a bath. Full of vape liquid from vaping around my computer. I work on my computer and chain vape, open windows but still they are full of eliquid.
 

MrMeowgi

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Maybe fans to push the vapor away. Unfortunately they don't make a vapor shark that eats the clouds inside. This has been an issue with many over the last years since vaping.

Sent from a pile of wood chips
 

DaBunny

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Using desiccants to soak up wet electronics
Water damage is one of the more common threats to portable electronics, but sometimes if you dry them out properly, you can restore your otherwise broken device.


iFixIt Thirsty Bag Desiccant options like iFixIt's new "Thirsty Bag" can very effectively clear liquids from electronics.iFixIt
Unfortunately many times people use methods for doing this that either are ineffective or that may damage the device. For instance, technically dried grains such as rice will absorb liquids, so people have used this as an available desiccant to dry out a device. However, rice is relatively ineffective at absorbing liquid from the air and may not be as much help as people think. Additionally, since heat helps water evaporate people have at times baked their devices in ovens or with hair dryers, resulting in melted components and burned circuits (memory circuits such as ROM and RAM are fairly susceptible to damage from overheating).

To help in drying out small devices like iPhones and iPods, the folks at iFixIt have come up with a drying "Thirsty Bag" which is a sealed container that contains the Molecular Sieve desiccant. You can place a drenched phone, camera, or any other device into it and after a while the liquid will absorb into the desiccant and leave the device dry. To help in this process, you can heat the package up a bit using an electric warming pad or similar device, but do not use an oven, as it is very easy to overheat and damage an otherwise restorable the device.

iFixIt's Thirsty Bag is useful, but is sized for smaller devices; however, you can still use it for drying out laptops and other items that will not fit in the bag. To do this for laptops, you will need several additional tools:

  1. Canned or compressed air.
  2. Screwdrivers and manuals for opening up the bottom of your laptop (Mac manuals are available at iFixIt)
  3. A few of iFixIt's Thirsty Bags or another desiccant material like Drierite or Silica Gel.
  4. A heating pad or other heat source.
  5. A sealed bag or airtight plastic container that is just large enough to hold your device.
With these tools handy, open the device as much as possible by removing the battery, hard drive, and optionally the RAM. Then unscrew the bottom cover and remove it so the guts of the system are exposed, and then get a soft item like a few wads of toilet paper and use them to wedge the screen open. Then use the canned air to blow in and around the device to rid it of as much liquid as possible.

After this is done, prepare the container by placing the desiccant in the bottom and covering it with some paper towels. If you are using iFixIt's Thirsty Bags, then you can cut or prop them open, and then place them in the container. Then place the laptop and its removed components into the container, propping them up so air can flow around them as much as possible, and seal the container to prevent humid air from entering it.

The last step is to place the container in a warm place, or on the heating pad, and let it stay there for at least a few days. Ensure that the temperature does not exceed the recommended storage temperature for your device (usually somewhere around 100-110 degrees F, though check your device's specifications). Depending on the degree of fluid penetration, you might need to keep the device in there for up to a week to ensure it is fully dry.

When you are ready to try the device again, reassemble it and try powering it on, and with some luck if the only problem was liquid shorting of components, then the device should start right up again.

If the device is still not working anymore and is not covered by any warranty, then a final step you can try is to rinse the device and dry it again. Since it is the salts and other charged contaminants in water that make it conductive, when liquids like soda or juice dry they leave the residual salts behind that can continue to short out a circuit. As a result, you can use pure distilled water (ensure it is distilled and not "mineral" water), to wash the circuits of the device followed by another round of drying it with desiccants. Feel free to liberally dunk the device in copious amounts of pure distilled water so it flows in and around it, followed by draining the device, opening it up, and placing it in the desiccant chamber again to dry.

Doing this should clear out residual salt contaminants left behind from the initial liquid, and potentially clear any shorts they may be causing. Again, only do this as a last resort if an initial drying does not work, and if the device is not covered by any warranties (i.e., you have a dead device you would otherwise just throw out and replace).

{{Just a thought}}
 

nadalama

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Maybe fans to push the vapor away. Unfortunately they don't make a vapor shark that eats the clouds inside. This has been an issue with many over the last years since vaping.

Sent from a pile of wood chips

Seriously? (Not being sarcastic, I'm asking.) I've been vaping in my living room for nine years. Had laptops in here the entire time. Have had said laptops open a half dozen times over the years to clean out or replace thermal paste, add memory, etc. Never saw one wet inside at all! Not even the slightest bit damp!
 

MrMeowgi

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Seriously? (Not being sarcastic, I'm asking.) I've been vaping in my living room for nine years. Had laptops in here the entire time. Have had said laptops open a half dozen times over the years to clean out or replace thermal paste, add memory, etc. Never saw one wet inside at all! Not even the slightest bit damp!
I've seen numerous reports of not liquid but stickiness. Fans stop working and desktops and laptops opened to be found a sticky mess. Even Xbox and playstations

Sent from a pile of wood chips
 

MrMeowgi

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I'd say in a stagnant room with less airflow would be more of a cause as well. If the room is ventilated well it may not be as much of an issue

Sent from a pile of wood chips
 

nadalama

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I've seen numerous reports of not liquid but stickiness. Fans stop working and desktops and laptops opened to be found a sticky mess. Even Xbox and playstations

Sent from a pile of wood chips

Moving air must really help, then. I keep the air conditioning aimed right at me all the time. Who knew!?!

The area where I sit is also very open, kitchen, living room, and two hallways branching off, all without much obstruction.
 

MrMeowgi

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Moving air must really help, then. I keep the air conditioning aimed right at me all the time. Who knew!?!
My wife is the same. Air on. 2 fans in the living room. One in the bedroom. All in front of the vents. Lol. Winter is the same except for the air.

Sent from a pile of wood chips
 

~Don~

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I can say for sure that it can leave a wet like residue on components.

I clean my desktop once a month due to vaping... room is well ventilated... my water cooling rads need extra care to get cleaned...and a few mini fans on the mother board...and case fans.

So I can see it become an issue if not cleaned regularly.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

DaBunny

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well sparkey can be kind of {{ ?? KIND OF ?? }} messy sometimes
I have seen Lake Ejuice by the side of his chair.. { setting stuff on it side knocking down leaving open }
and BY GOLLY if dat aint da cel phone going in for a landing..

so befor I Invested into our first not a 10 dollar cel phone.
did some re search..

from the rice trick
to da absorbing bags
to the send it in.
and or replace of it all.

{{ got a water proof cel phone with a SERIOUS crash proof case }}
so far ZERO issue around lake E-juice
@beautyandthevape
i suggest ya
look into water proof Macbooks
or a way of water/ coffee/ Ejuice proofing it.
the next time you have to go out to buy if you have to .
 
Last edited:

MyMagicMist

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Seriously? (Not being sarcastic, I'm asking.) I've been vaping in my living room for nine years. Had laptops in here the entire time. Have had said laptops open a half dozen times over the years to clean out or replace thermal paste, add memory, etc. Never saw one wet inside at all! Not even the slightest bit damp!

Likewise, I set right beside an open sided desktop tower. Not seen any dampness. At worse I may need a light vinegar and water wiping down of a monitor, television screen. Not had any issue with vapor causing any moisture, wetness issues in any electronics. Not saying it can not happen but in my experience it has not.

Hm, having a read, I see. Did not mean to sound a jerk.
 
No I am
Are you saying as in actual liquid?
no spills just from the vape being suck
well sparkey can be kind of {{ ?? KIND OF ?? }} messy sometimes
I have seen Lake Ejuice by the side of his chair.. { setting stuff on it side knocking down leaving open }
and BY GOLLY if dat aint da cel phone going in for a landing..

so befor I Invested into our first not a 10 dollar cel phone.
did some re search..

from the rice trick
to da absorbing bags
to the send it in.
and or replace of it all.

{{ got a water proof cel phone with a SERIOUS crash proof case }}
so far ZERO issue around lake E-juice
@beautyandthevape
i suggest ya
look into water proof Macbooks
or a way of water/ coffee/ Ejuice proofing it.
the next time you have to go out to buy if you have to .
not spills, residue from the vape being sucked into the vents on the macbook
 

gsmit1

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All I know is I do alot of work online and this home built machine is less than 3 feet in front of me on a dresser at chest level.

I opened it for the first time in over a year a couple weeks ago to change out a dead cpu cooling fan and there was almost nothing in there. I mean I wasn't looking for it as I was in a hurry to get the machine back up, but I've been working on computers for over 20 years and it would have caught my attention if it was all sticky or gooey. The usual dust with maybe some minor juice condensation mixed in.

Unless somebody is blowing clouds directly into the fan ports or something I don't know how it could be wet inside. Not calling anybody a liar, but only being honest with my experience.
 

gsmit1

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@beautyandthevape
I guess if you got the fans or the ports sticky enough it could overheat, but modern computers, PCs anyway should have an auto-shutdown function if they get too hot. I'm sure Macs have that too.
 

gsmit1

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I have a decent laptop that I don't use nearly as much as the desktop here and of course laptops have a lot less internal space. I've worked on hundreds, maybe thousands of those too.

It does seem if sitting right near one and chain vaping, over time condensation would build up more in a laptop.
 

Carambrda

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Aside from making sure that your room is always well ventilated, there are a number of things that you can consider using in addition to that. For example, stick to low power computing on a silent laptop the cooling fan in which doesn't come on if you keep the power consumption of the laptop down low enough, and, put the laptop on a table behind a 55″ TV that's hooked up to the laptop via HDMI cable, and, get a wireless keyboard and a mouse to go with that combo so then you can sit at 12 ft. distance away from the laptop.

For a bit higher power computing, you might also want to look into the fun hobby of assembling your own fanless desktop PC hardware configurations.



With a bit of creativity, and if you have the courage for it, you could also decide to build an enclosure that receives only clean air via a duct, or build an external water cooling system that goes inside a box in an adjacent space where the air is clean. Depending on the thickness of your walls and metal obstacles interfering with the stability of wireless signals, you might even get away with just putting the laptop in an adjacent room, e.g. by using a Wireless Display (Intel WiDi) connection on a compatible monitor and a Logitech wireless keyboard + mouse combo, or just run the cables through your wall if drilling a hole is not a problem. I have been using my Logitech K800 for years, and it never lost a connection.
 
Yes seriously. Apple has show me the pictures of them and they look totally wet.
Seriously? (Not being sarcastic, I'm asking.) I've been vaping in my living room for nine years. Had laptops in here the entire time. Have had said laptops open a half dozen times over the years to clean out or replace thermal paste, add memory, etc. Never saw one wet inside at all! Not even the slightest bit damp!
 
Aside from making sure that your room is always well ventilated, there are a number of things that you can consider using in addition to that. For example, stick to low power computing on a silent laptop the cooling fan in which doesn't come on if you keep the power consumption of the laptop down low enough, and, put the laptop on a table behind a 55″ TV that's hooked up to the laptop via HDMI cable, and, get a wireless keyboard and a mouse to go with that combo so then you can sit at 12 ft. distance away from the laptop.

For a bit higher power computing, you might also want to look into the fun hobby of assembling your own fanless desktop PC hardware configurations.



With a bit of creativity, and if you have the courage for it, you could also decide to build an enclosure that receives only clean air via a duct, or build an external water cooling system that goes inside a box in an adjacent space where the air is clean. Depending on the thickness of your walls and metal obstacles interfering with the stability of wireless signals, you might even get away with just putting the laptop in an adjacent room, e.g. by using a Wireless Display (Intel WiDi) connection on a compatible monitor and a Logitech wireless keyboard + mouse combo, or just run the cables through your wall if drilling a hole is not a problem. I have been using my Logitech K800 for years, and it never lost a connection.
I wish I had money for a 55 inch TV to do this, good solution.
 

Carambrda

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gsmit1

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Years (and years) ago I had a pc that I rigged up to display on a crt television. Flat screens were just coming out then. I used a Logitech handheld wireless trackball controller for the computer so I could watch digital video clips on the tv from the couch :)
 

nadalama

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Remember Sony's Trinitron CRT TVs? I liked our first one so much I bought a Sony Vaio PC with a Trinitron monitor. If it hadn't become obsolete, I'd still be using that thing.
 

Carambrda

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Years (and years) ago I had a pc that I rigged up to display on a crt television. Flat screens were just coming out then. I used a Logitech handheld wireless trackball controller for the computer so I could watch digital video clips on the tv from the couch :)
A little over 14 years ago I got the Asus 7800 GTX Top Edition vidcard that came with VIVO (Video In Video Out). My VCR was hooked up to the input via a SCART to A/V + RGB + S-Video adapter piece, my CRT TV hooked up to the output. Watching CinemaCraft encoder run at ultra high settings on the OC'd Intel Prescott CPU @4GHz was fun. :giggle:
 

Carambrda

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Remember Sony's Trinitron CRT TVs? I liked our first one so much I bought a Sony Vaio PC with a Trinitron monitor. If it hadn't become obsolete, I'd still be using that thing.
In the early 1980s, when I was 11, my parents got a Black Trinitron with stereo sound. MTV ← ?
 

gsmit1

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A little over 14 years ago I got the Asus 7800 GTX Top Edition vidcard that came with VIVO (Video In Video Out). My VCR was hooked up to the input via a SCART to A/V + RGB + S-Video adapter piece, my CRT TV hooked up to the output. Watching CinemaCraft encoder run at ultra high settings on the OC'd Intel Prescott CPU @4GHz was fun. :giggle:
I don't even exactly remember now which setup I used on that machine. I think it had RCA video out and I just used the PC audio. The resolution wasn't great, especially for windows itself, but online and family videos looked good enough.

I think @beautyandthevape is wondering how she lost control of her thread.
 

Carambrda

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I don't even exactly remember now which setup I used on that machine. I think it had RCA video out and I just used the PC audio. The resolution wasn't great, especially for windows itself, but online and family videos looked good enough.

I think @beautyandthevape is wondering how she lost control of her thread.
Yea, the yellow RCA is called A/V Composite. The PC audio output is what I also used, but I used the PC audio input also in addition to it so, because the PC audio input had passthrough, I could monitor the audio part of a live analog TV broadcast through the PC speakers while at the same time also digitally recording both the audio and the video on the PC, while at the same also using the CRT TV to monitor the video. The Asus card could capture NTSC and PAL signals in full res. Also, to watch live video content with real-time deinterlacing, I had this other freeware program called DScaler. I also had an internal Plextor DVD writer (8x speed) so I could use Nero Vision to capture straight to DVD in real-time. Or capture raw onto harddrive, use CinemaCraft encoder to get the highest DVD compatible picture quality after that, run the DVD authoring program, and burn. Sometimes I used another adaptation of this same workflow chain for transcoding DVDs with VirtualDUB so they would fit onto a single layer DVD, but usually I would just encode a 2CD XviD because that went so much faster in comparison, and, the 2CD could also be copied to harddrive faster, i.e. by reading the 2 discs simultaneously while at the same time also merging the split .avi seamlessly back together again. :giggle:

On topic: Looks like I missed the fact the 50″ of that LG is already sold out. The 55″ version they have on clearance, for only $50 extra.
 

MyMagicMist

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I wonder if a dehumidifier would draw out the the vapor. Know we also these activated charcoal moisture drawing tubs in our room to draw out dampness. We of course use a dollar store version of these. That and I reckon keeping it ventilated keeps this issue at bay here.
 

Carambrda

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I wonder if a dehumidifier would draw out the the vapor. Know we also these activated charcoal moisture drawing tubs in our room to draw out dampness. We of course use a dollar store version of these. That and I reckon keeping it ventilated keeps this issue at bay here.
A dehumidifier only slightly works, as it can't filter out the PG/VG. An air purifier works a lot better, but they tend to either be expensive or be noisy, and, the filters that they use aren't exactly cheap either... these filters need to be replaced from time to time. A simple extractor fan attached to a piece of plywood with a cutout is easy to set up in an opened window, and can easily be removed each time before closing the window again. And it works even better if you blow your clouds straight into it. I was going to build myself a simple downdraft ventilation system the exhaust of which was going to be detachable from the plywood, but I always keep my window open so, with my laptop standing behind my TV against the opposite wall, I soon found it would be mostly overkill. The laptop has been working fine for 2 years and a half so... maybe when I'm about to get a new one. :p
 
The 50″ version of the LG UM7300 is only $380 at BestBuy right now. Or maybe just wait till Black Friday. :giggle:
Don't have that right now, but thank you!
I wonder if a dehumidifier would draw out the the vapor. Know we also these activated charcoal moisture drawing tubs in our room to draw out dampness. We of course use a dollar store version of these. That and I reckon keeping it ventilated keeps this issue at bay here.
I always have all my windows open. No air conditioning. I do not have a dehumidifier but wonder also
 
The 50″ version of the LG UM7300 is only $380 at BestBuy right now. Or maybe just wait till Black Friday. :giggle:
Don't have that right now, but thank you!
I wonder if a dehumidifier would draw out the the vapor. Know we also these activated charcoal moisture drawing tubs in our room to draw out dampness. We of course use a dollar store version of these. That and I reckon keeping it ventilated keeps this issue at bay here.
I always have all my windows open. No air conditioning. I do not have a dehumidifier but wonder also
 
Remember Sony's Trinitron CRT TVs? I liked our first one so much I bought a Sony Vaio PC with a Trinitron monitor. If it hadn't become obsolete, I'd still be using that thing.
Side note, CRT monitors (especially big ones in a 16:9 aspect ratio) are actually worth quite a bit these days as you can overclock refresh rate and (I think) resolution.

@OP
I didn't think vaping would be so harmful to electronics. An activated carbon filter and fam in the room might work to remove some of the vapour. Or you could exhale into a sploof ( https://www.royalqueenseeds.com/blog-the-ultimate-guide-to-making-a-sploof-n861) which is basically a smoke filter designed to trap smoke, scent and other stuff.

I never thought that PG and VG were all that conductive however mac books have a big problem where the power lines on a screen cable (60 Volts) are right beside your CPU data lines (about 3 Volts) so if they bridge you end up frying your processor and even a moist room can cause that. The usual way to build is with the high voltage lines away from data lines and ground lines between them so if they do bridge you just end up with a minor problem rather than a dead device.
Apple have known about this issue for years but not changed things.
Start at about 3 mins 40 and watch until you understand why this is bad:
It's an old video but the design hasn't changed. I assume other laptop manufacturers may also do similar things but apple seems to do it a lot where they make machines that aren't too resilient.
 

Lady Sarah

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Side note, CRT monitors (especially big ones in a 16:9 aspect ratio) are actually worth quite a bit these days as you can overclock refresh rate and (I think) resolution.

@OP
I didn't think vaping would be so harmful to electronics. An activated carbon filter and fam in the room might work to remove some of the vapour. Or you could exhale into a sploof ( https://www.royalqueenseeds.com/blog-the-ultimate-guide-to-making-a-sploof-n861) which is basically a smoke filter designed to trap smoke, scent and other stuff.

I never thought that PG and VG were all that conductive however mac books have a big problem where the power lines on a screen cable (60 Volts) are right beside your CPU data lines (about 3 Volts) so if they bridge you end up frying your processor and even a moist room can cause that. The usual way to build is with the high voltage lines away from data lines and ground lines between them so if they do bridge you just end up with a minor problem rather than a dead device.
Apple have known about this issue for years but not changed things.
Start at about 3 mins 40 and watch until you understand why this is bad:
It's an old video but the design hasn't changed. I assume other laptop manufacturers may also do similar things but apple seems to do it a lot where they make machines that aren't too resilient.
Pay attention to the last reply date, lest ye become a necromonger.
 

Bliss Doubt

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I vape at my computer constantly. My current Dell laptop was new in 2017. Here in south Texas, I do always have the a/c cycling on and off during most of three seasons, and the heater on the rare occasion when it gets cold. No such issues as the OP describes, but I use 80/20 pg/vg, no massive clouds. The issue with laptop fans is how they suck in dust. Hard to stay ahead of that. I use a clean soft lipstick brush I keep at my desk for swiping at the vents, but what's inside will have to remain a mystery. I can't figure out how to get the bottom off this Inspiron model. I've removed all the screws, couldn't get it to budge. Even my tech guy couldn't get it off, but he wedged it open and used compressed air to blow out the years of accumulated dust. That was a couple of years ago.
 
I just put a Truflat in the dumpster. It was idk 20 years old. It still worked.
CRT TVs/Monitors are so much better in terms of longevity compared to modern LCD (and maybe OLED) tech. I opened up one to salvage parts (it still worked and was at least 30 years old and I have an even older working one) and because of how they work they literally suck dust in due to static electricity so the inside was filthy with dust clinging to the anode cap and the wire going back to the flyback transformer (note that if you want to salvage these either have them turned off for a few years or know how to ground the anode as you can get a really bad (hospital or morgue bad) shock from them, I took one or two apart without harm when I was a kid but I had no idea how dangerous they can be and was lucky. Discharge the anode to ground if you want to take one apart or if you're doing repairs keep away from the big (often red) wire coming from the flyback and going to a suction cup on the tube.

Back on topic (for an age old thread, sorry for the necro but now that there seems to be life I'm compelled to comment) modern electronics are designed to be as compact and non user servicible as possible. Usually this is done under the guise of user safety or data security when it comes to laptops and smartphones and they're made more and more compact to seem competitive while this makes any type of repair almost impossible unless you are really good at surface mount soldering and can get the schematic and parts. Go back 30-40 years and the schematic and parts list came with the item, or could be gotten from the manufacturer as well as repair parts even if things weren't 'user serviceable' it's gotten worse recently too. My old laptop had a pretty bombproof screen with no backlight leaks and the ability to have a hard drive, small SSD and am m.2 SSD.
The new one comes with RTX graphics but there's a noticible amount of backlight glow, it's smaller and feels more fragile, has the headphone and mic merged, has no optical audio out (the last did it through a 3.5mm audio jack) and merges the mic and headset on one jack.
The smaller size also means that small particles are more likely to be a problem for airflow. For example vape fog.
 

Carambrda

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I vape at my computer constantly. My current Dell laptop was new in 2017. Here in south Texas, I do always have the a/c cycling on and off during most of three seasons, and the heater on the rare occasion when it gets cold. No such issues as the OP describes, but I use 80/20 pg/vg, no massive clouds. The issue with laptop fans is how they suck in dust. Hard to stay ahead of that. I use a clean soft lipstick brush I keep at my desk for swiping at the vents, but what's inside will have to remain a mystery. I can't figure out how to get the bottom off this Inspiron model. I've removed all the screws, couldn't get it to budge. Even my tech guy couldn't get it off, but he wedged it open and used compressed air to blow out the years of accumulated dust. That was a couple of years ago.
My laptop is standing behind my 55 inch flatscreen TV, there's ~12 ft. distance between my laptop and me. I constanly vape 70% VG juices with fairly massive clouds. My laptop is 15.4 inch with a standard thickness and it uses an Intel 11th gen CPU (Core i5-1135G7), which causes its cooling fan to spin up regularly. But I use a free program called ThrottleStop that allows me to temporarily disable the Turbo Mode of my CPU. Doing this keeps its clock speed from ramping all the way up to 3.2GHz each time when the CPU wants to prevent slowdowns.

These slowdowns I can live with when I'm not doing any important stuff. The cooling fan remains quasi silent at all times when Turbo is off and Speed Shift (not to be confused with SpeedStep) is set to its maximum of 255 (higher numbers = lower fan speeds of the cooling fan at the sacrifice of holding the CPU performance back more, you can just click on the number to edit it albeit the fact you can click on it is not very intuitive). I can still re-enable Turbo with just a single mouse click on the checkbox, no reboot is required for this setting to take effect, it takes effect immediately the moment when I click on this checkbox. It's one of those reasons why I never buy anything from AMD. I never use headphones and loud fan noise drives me freakishly insane. On my previous-old laptop I was using ThrottleStop to also undervolt my CPU (Intel Core i5-7200U), go to TechPowerup.com forum website if you don't know what it means.

I can get a handle on how much of my vapor is still lingering in my room even after the vapor has gone invisible, by looking in my Dyson app on my smartphone, as my Dyson Pure Cool ("Desktop" model, from 2018) is set to keep real-time monitoring the air and sending the data to Dyson's server wirelessly over the internet. (Even, after the Dyson Pure Cool is switched to standby.) The air filter (HEPA + active carbon) that's inside this device clogs up really fast if I leave it spinning each time after I blow my cloud. However, it's possible to continue using this device after the air filter has been removed from it.

Further, my A/C unit is the type that has an ionizer built into it. With the ionizer function turned on, by using the 2nd to lowest fan speed setting it neutralizes the thick vapor in a matter of only minutes. Most of the time, I leave my window and my inner door open. Letting in lots of fresh outside air always is important, vaping or not vaping.
 
How does anyone solve this issue besides the "don't vape around your computer". I have three totally dead Macbooks when opened up looks like someone just gave them a bath. Full of vape liquid from vaping around my computer. I work on my computer and chain vape, open windows but still they are full of eliquid.
since you sit next to a window buy one of them suctions fans that attaches to glass to suck vapor out your window, and try not to blow vapor on your monitor, I learned about this the hard way too, it bricked my gaming rig and it was A very expansive mistake.
 
Could be a combination of things. Not necessarily the vape. Room humidity plays a huge role in how dust sticks to things. This is why I hate laptops. I use a regular PC and I replace my keyboard often. After about 6 months it's so nasty even though I clean it regularly. Can't do that with a laptop and I think that's gross.

I smoked for many years and it never destroyed a computer. Monitors and keyboards get nasty. But not the PC. I do open them from time to time and dust, but it was never sticky. And I've always had my PC in front of a window with a fan blowing out. And the PC on the floor. I'm sure none of this helps, I'm rambling, lol.
 

Bliss Doubt

Bronze Contributor
Member For 5 Years
My laptop is standing behind my 55 inch flatscreen TV, there's ~12 ft. distance between my laptop and me. I constanly vape 70% VG juices with fairly massive clouds. My laptop is 15.4 inch with a standard thickness and it uses an Intel 11th gen CPU (Core i5-1135G7), which causes its cooling fan to spin up regularly. But I use a free program called ThrottleStop that allows me to temporarily disable the Turbo Mode of my CPU. Doing this keeps its clock speed from ramping all the way up to 3.2GHz each time when the CPU wants to prevent slowdowns.

These slowdowns I can live with when I'm not doing any important stuff. The cooling fan remains quasi silent at all times when Turbo is off and Speed Shift (not to be confused with SpeedStep) is set to its maximum of 255 (higher numbers = lower fan speeds of the cooling fan at the sacrifice of holding the CPU performance back more, you can just click on the number to edit it albeit the fact you can click on it is not very intuitive). I can still re-enable Turbo with just a single mouse click on the checkbox, no reboot is required for this setting to take effect, it takes effect immediately the moment when I click on this checkbox. It's one of those reasons why I never buy anything from AMD. I never use headphones and loud fan noise drives me freakishly insane. On my previous-old laptop I was using ThrottleStop to also undervolt my CPU (Intel Core i5-7200U), go to TechPowerup.com forum website if you don't know what it means.

I can get a handle on how much of my vapor is still lingering in my room even after the vapor has gone invisible, by looking in my Dyson app on my smartphone, as my Dyson Pure Cool ("Desktop" model, from 2018) is set to keep real-time monitoring the air and sending the data to Dyson's server wirelessly over the internet. (Even, after the Dyson Pure Cool is switched to standby.) The air filter (HEPA + active carbon) that's inside this device clogs up really fast if I leave it spinning each time after I blow my cloud. However, it's possible to continue using this device after the air filter has been removed from it.

Further, my A/C unit is the type that has an ionizer built into it. With the ionizer function turned on, by using the 2nd to lowest fan speed setting it neutralizes the thick vapor in a matter of only minutes. Most of the time, I leave my window and my inner door open. Letting in lots of fresh outside air always is important, vaping or not vaping.
You're terrifyingly knowledgeable. I share your dislike of AMD technology, though I'm not sure of the basis of that dislike. My first laptop was a Toshiba, and you saw AMD everywhere you looked in the files and functions. It crashed all the time. I replaced it when it was only two years old, but I still have it stored in a closet as a backup in case my Dell gives out in the middle of a work day.

Anyway, I'm at a point where I would like to have a sturdy desktop computer, simply because laptops are noisy. At the old brick & mortar, where we had desktops, with the screen and keyboard on top of the desk, the rest of the stuff underneath the arm of the desk, I don't remember computers being noisy. I doubt I'll get my wish, because of space.

I've been looking at Libreboot because they seem sincere about privacy, but I don't think they have a desktop model, and their largest laptop is with only a 15.4" screen. My Dell has a 17.3" screen, which is plenty for me. Also their best is only 8gb as compared to my Inspiron's 16gb, but after four years of storing client files, massive amounts of music, a few videos I've made, photos, program downloads and devices, I'm only at about 20 percent usage of that 16gb, so I think really 8gb would be just fine.
 

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