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Vaping on the Front or back Porch

SteveS45

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Yeah I wondered that. I thought seeing as it was in the US and you guys have better overall fuel quality than us, ours is amongst the lowest quality petrol in the world due to high sulphur content, that level was where your premium started at. Our premium starts at 95 up to 98.
Standard is 91.

Most new cars require 89 Octane and if you use Premium you can get your Check Engine Light to come on~! Way back when Sunoco had the Highest Octane Fuel available for daily drivers I think it was 94.
 

Rhianne

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Good morning, everyone. <3
 

Synphul

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I have watched a few of these videos and my question is when did 89 Octane become High Octane? Premium is 93 and True High Octane is CAM 2 104+
I've not heard of 89 being 'high' octane. I was familiar with it being sold as 'mid grade'. 87 being low octane, 89 mid, 91 or 93 as high and above that super. My husqvarna suggests to use fuel with an octane of 90+ which around here is high or super unleaded. Higher octane fuel is more stable, less volatile and won't risk preignition under higher compression like lower octane will. Supposed to be better/safer for the engine and reduce cylinder wear.

I don't know if it's true of all saws. I always grew up thinking yard tools like push mowers and weed whackers took shit fuel, the stuff you wouldn't even put in your car. Just slop it in the yard tool with 2 stroke oil if needed and away ya went. My earlier poulan saws I used regular unleaded 87 cheap shit in them. Was always fresh mixed, just lower grade fuel. When I read the husky manual I didn't want to fuck it up. Read about the high octane fuel and surprised me. But that's what I've run in that saw for years at a 50:1 ratio and had no issues. Along with swapping out fuel filters, air filters and spark plugs.
 

SteveS45

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I've not heard of 89 being 'high' octane. I was familiar with it being sold as 'mid grade'. 87 being low octane, 89 mid, 91 or 93 as high and above that super. My husqvarna suggests to use fuel with an octane of 90+ which around here is high or super unleaded. Higher octane fuel is more stable, less volatile and won't risk preignition under higher compression like lower octane will. Supposed to be better/safer for the engine and reduce cylinder wear.

I don't know if it's true of all saws. I always grew up thinking yard tools like push mowers and weed whackers took shit fuel, the stuff you wouldn't even put in your car. Just slop it in the yard tool with 2 stroke oil if needed and away ya went. My earlier poulan saws I used regular unleaded 87 cheap shit in them. Was always fresh mixed, just lower grade fuel. When I read the husky manual I didn't want to fuck it up. Read about the high octane fuel and surprised me. But that's what I've run in that saw for years at a 50:1 ratio and had no issues. Along with swapping out fuel filters, air filters and spark plugs.

I was mistaken before, here is the Octane Ratings

Most gas stations offer a choice between 3 different octane levels:


  • Regular (85-88, usually 87)
  • Mid-Grade/Plus (88-90, usually 89)
  • Premium (91-93, usually 92)
 

SteveS45

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So I had a busy day today being out early to buy the new blower and assemble it. I was out in the front lawn pulling the Creeping Charlie because all the yellow was driving me nuts. I killed it with weed killer a week or so ago. And I was feeding my little bird friends~!

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The Robins are like little Road Runners scooting around the yard and they are pretty fearless running right past me.
 

SteveS45

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Between the Birdbath and feeding the birds I turned my backyard into a Bird Sanctuary~! It is nice sitting in the backyard vaping with nature. Wish I had some of the massive properties some of you post pics of~!
 

Synphul

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Member For 4 Years
Been debating whether to buy a new grill or put money into rigging the one I've got together. I must live in the belt buckle of the rust belt. That and cheap junk ass mass produced grills that are made of steel's equivalent of tissue paper. Tired of sinking $100-130 every year or other year into bbq's. Not really looking to invest $300+ into one either.

I've got one of those charbroil, dunno what size. 24" or 28"? something like that. I actually like the way it cooks and has nice cast iron grills. The rest of it is shit. The box is holding up so far but the adjustable coal tray has turned to dust practically. The ash pan has rusted to shit and fallen apart. The legs are ok until down near the bottom where the decorative rack (seriously a small bag of charcoal would bend it new) has rusted out of the legs and fisher price wheels and coat hanger axle have fallen out.

Contemplating cutting the legs off leaving them shorter. Setting cinder blocks on either side and maybe along the back edge, setting the sawn off legs into the holes. Getting some expanded steel and maybe some thin flat stock to rig up the coal tray again. Get some sort of thinner sheet metal for an ash pan. Can't be any flimsier than what was in it. Figure I might be out $50-60 and get another season or two out of it. The adjuster for the coal pan still works and the frames last I checked were still intact so the adjustment part works.

Sadly a lot of the $200-300 models didn't look any sturdier, just side smoker attachments or extra outboard racks. And I wondered why when I saw neighbors with grills they always looked like shit or were cobbled together metal drums. And now I know. :( These grills used to last me 3, maybe 4 seasons now I'm lucky if I get through the first and the second isn't already falling apart.
 

Synphul

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Ever checked out one of the Traeger Green Egg Grills? They are like $1,500~!
For 1500 better last 10-15yrs. And start me out with a side of beef the first 3-5yrs. I'll toss some rocks in a circle, light a fallen tree on fire and stab a stick through a hunk of meat. Roast it like a damn marshmallow before I spend that on a grill. haha.
 

Synphul

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Member For 4 Years
Yeah, I know what you mean but I confused Traeger and Green Egg they are 2 different grills.

View attachment 182437
Those are awesome. And yea now that Green Egg came out there's a lot of knockoffs. Still $500 or so. Actually saw a guy cobble one together using terra cotta pots lol. Didn't look half bad. I don't grill year round only in the summer months with nicer weather. And even when it's a lot it's maybe 4-5x, maybe 6x a month. Not enough to justify that sort of investment and I don't cook for big crowds.

I get having sexy grills for the enthusiast with premium features like superb temp regulation, no cold spots, digital thermostat controlled smokers or whatever for premium prices. But basic grills for $100-150 should at least last a few years of light use. I mean considering other cooking appliances. $20 coffee pot, 4-5yrs. $120 bread machine, 8-10yrs. Instapot, $70 and people have had theirs for 5-6yrs or however long.

For some reason a $100-150 grill they consider an annual purchase. People would lose their shit if they had to buy a new toaster or microwave or instapot every single year for the price they sell at. Granted they're electric but still cooking appliances. And get used way more often than my grills get used. The models I look at aren't fancy. Spindly legs so I don't have to hunch over a fire. Holds the hot shit in the bottom with a rack over it. Pretty basic. And for $100-150 I'll move the food around when there's a cool spot. I'm ok with that. I don't expect it to maintain heat within 5-10F for 3-4hrs of cooking. Just something I slap marinated chicken or steak on. I found some replacement components but for the price of a coal tray and ash pan, may as well just buy a whole new grill. I don't expect them to last 10yrs or even 5, 3 or 4 seasons would be nice. Every year it's starting to feel like a rental fee.

Makes me wish I had a setup like my grandmother had in her old house. Living room on one side and kitchen on the other of a shared wall. The living room had a brick fireplace and chimney, on the flip side of the wall in the kitchen was an indoor grill that shared the chimney with a hood over it. Like a brick camp style counter with a cast iron grate and room for wood or charcoal underneath built in with an adjustable grill. I think she used it a handful of times the decades she lived there. Granted it's not the grilling out in the yard experience, but nice to be able to grill year round from the comfort of the kitchen and not set off the smoke alarms. lol.
 

Smigo

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Member For 1 Year
Most new cars require 89 Octane and if you use Premium you can get your Check Engine Light to come on~! Way back when Sunoco had the Highest Octane Fuel available for daily drivers I think it was 94.
We do have some differences dont we! Mines a Kia Seltos, 2 litre Atkinson engine, which takes 91 but the fill port sticker says it can use premium. I tried it on a full tank of 95 premium and saw no noticeable gain at all in performance or mileage. I heard we may get the low sulphur cleaner fuel by 2024 or thereabouts.
 

nadalama

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I was gonna say, first thing I'd do is hit e-Bay and Craigslist, maybe the FB marketplace, see if some rich guy is moving and doesn't need his expensive-ass grill any more.

I'd a lot rather have a top-of-the-line grill that someone has used a little bit than cheap shit that I could afford new. Who knows? You might get lucky!
 

Lady Sarah

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I was gonna say, first thing I'd do is hit e-Bay and Craigslist, maybe the FB marketplace, see if some rich guy is moving and doesn't need his expensive-ass grill any more.

I'd a lot rather have a top-of-the-line grill that someone has used a little bit than cheap shit that I could afford new. Who knows? You might get lucky!
Who knows? Maybe get lucky, and get a good old fashioned Texas smoker. A lot of Texans do not buy smokers, because the prices are just way too high, at $1500 and up. But then, even many of the ladies know how to weld.
 

SteveS45

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Who knows? Maybe get lucky, and get a good old fashioned Texas smoker. A lot of Texans do not buy smokers, because the prices are just way too high, at $1500 and up. But then, even many of the ladies know how to weld.

I was thinking about building my own Smoker when I saw Tickle on Moonshiners build one~!
 

nadalama

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I was thinking about building my own Smoker when I saw Tickle on Moonshiners build one~!

A lot of people down this way, esp in rural areas, have pig cookers made out of 55-gallon drums. They use them in "pig pickins" where they cook either a whole or a half pig and other people bring fixins, and when the pig is ready, you just use a meat fork to pull some of it off the pig that's still on the cooker.

If you want extra barbecue sauce on it (homemade, vinegar based with crushed red pepper, not a lot of tomato sauce in it) there's usually a squeeze bottle and you just squeeze some on the pig on your plate.

It's a bonus if someone has a gas cooker with a big pot of oil where somebody can cook homemade hush puppies.

Oh, and beer is a requirement. Usually a LOT of beer.

This was a new thing to me when I got married. We never did this where I grew up, even though it was only about 4 or 5 hours away. I take it that Tickle's cooker was similar to what I'm talking about here, since that season of Moonshiners was filmed in the next county to the west of us.
 

SteveS45

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A lot of people down this way, esp in rural areas, have pig cookers made out of 55-gallon drums. They use them in "pig pickins" where they cook either a whole or a half pig and other people bring fixins, and when the pig is ready, you just use a meat fork to pull some of it off the pig that's still on the cooker.

If you want extra barbecue sauce on it (homemade, vinegar based with crushed red pepper, not a lot of tomato sauce in it) there's usually a squeeze bottle and you just squeeze some on the pig on your plate.

It's a bonus if someone has a gas cooker with a big pot of oil where somebody can cook homemade hush puppies.

Oh, and beer is a requirement. Usually a LOT of beer.

This was a new thing to me when I got married. We never did this where I grew up, even though it was only about 4 or 5 hours away. I take it that Tickle's cooker was similar to what I'm talking about here, since that season of Moonshiners was filmed in the next county to the west of us.

I absolutely LOVE it~! I wish I had enough family to Roast a Pig~! And one of these days I want to make my own smoker but use a smaller steel drum and not a 55 gallon.
 

nadalama

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I absolutely LOVE it~! I wish I had enough family to Roast a Pig~! And one of these days I want to make my own smoker but use a smaller steel drum and not a 55 gallon.

One of my co-workers had one of those cookers, and for years he cooked the turkeys and hams for Thanksgiving on it. He'd hook it up to another co-worker's Jeep and they'd pull it to the "back yard" of our office, and start the turkeys about 7 a.m. They'd also cook those big aluminum roaster pans full of homemade mac & cheese, big pans of dressing, you name it, he could cook it.

When the meats were done, they'd bring them inside and put them on a table covered with newspaper, and carve all the meat up so it was easy to serve.

He passed away this year from complications of Covid, but he'd been fighting stage 4 lung cancer for 5 years or more also. He was a tough old bird, and we miss him terribly. If they do a dinner at Thanksgiving this year, it will be a pitiful imitation of dinners we've had in years past.
 

gopher_byrd

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Been debating whether to buy a new grill or put money into rigging the one I've got together. I must live in the belt buckle of the rust belt. That and cheap junk ass mass produced grills that are made of steel's equivalent of tissue paper. Tired of sinking $100-130 every year or other year into bbq's. Not really looking to invest $300+ into one either.

I've got one of those charbroil, dunno what size. 24" or 28"? something like that. I actually like the way it cooks and has nice cast iron grills. The rest of it is shit. The box is holding up so far but the adjustable coal tray has turned to dust practically. The ash pan has rusted to shit and fallen apart. The legs are ok until down near the bottom where the decorative rack (seriously a small bag of charcoal would bend it new) has rusted out of the legs and fisher price wheels and coat hanger axle have fallen out.

Contemplating cutting the legs off leaving them shorter. Setting cinder blocks on either side and maybe along the back edge, setting the sawn off legs into the holes. Getting some expanded steel and maybe some thin flat stock to rig up the coal tray again. Get some sort of thinner sheet metal for an ash pan. Can't be any flimsier than what was in it. Figure I might be out $50-60 and get another season or two out of it. The adjuster for the coal pan still works and the frames last I checked were still intact so the adjustment part works.

Sadly a lot of the $200-300 models didn't look any sturdier, just side smoker attachments or extra outboard racks. And I wondered why when I saw neighbors with grills they always looked like shit or were cobbled together metal drums. And now I know. :( These grills used to last me 3, maybe 4 seasons now I'm lucky if I get through the first and the second isn't already falling apart.
I have something similar to what you have. The tray that the charcoal sits on rusted out. What I did was snag a couple of sheets of stainless sheet metal from Home Depot and screwed them together sandwiching the parts from the original tray. That grill is now going on 19 years old.

One thing I found out is you need to remove the ash as soon as it's cooled down. That's what contributes to the rusting out of the coal tray.
 

SteveS45

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One thing I found out is you need to remove the ash as soon as it's cooled down. That's what contributes to the rusting out of the coal tray.

I found out that Sweet Baby Rays BBQ Sauce will Rust away a Chrome Grill if you leave it over the winter~!
 

Synphul

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Took another look at my grill, it's in worse shape than I thought. One end of the fire box is dented (dunno how especially given it's BEHIND the fold out rack). Think I'm gonna have to break down and buy one. Was looking at a char griller 'smokin champ' or whatever with offset smoker. Looks easy enough to dump ashes, smoking might be nice (my old electric smoker gave up the ghost). Has cast iron grates which is a plus.

My dad always used a weber and various family members had them. The classic kettle grills. I just never could get the hang of it, not a fan. It seems to make the top of everyone's 'best of' list but they just chap my ass. The solid grills are a pia for adding coals, playing the balancing game with all the food on the grill. The lid's not tall enough to cook much more than burgers or weenies. The ash pan is a pain in the ass. For whatever reason I find the square grills to work easier for me.

I'd love to weld one up, no welder though. Affordable welders are all stick models and that's one thing I couldn't get the hang of. Always get the stick stuck to crap and can't keep it flowing lol. When I worked maintenance for the truss plant I learned to weld using their mig. They had lots of nifty tools, chop saws, plasma cutters etc. I could get pretty nice welds with the mig, stick I make beyond rat turds. I'm a menace with one haha. If I had access to that work shop now I could probably whip up a decent 55gal grill in an hour or two complete with legs and everything.

Grill's seem to be a large item no one wants to ship and for local forget it. People around here use stuff to death until it's falling apart then want to charge $10 below sticker price for it like it's a national treasure. I mean me, I've given older grills away in condition far better than mine is in now. Or if it had some light surface rust or some paint flaked off like hell $10-15. Whatever. Most of the folks around here, missing the ash pan, charcoal grate rusted straight through with a cooking rack wired in place with bailing wire, rusted holes bigger than the air vents. Ehhh, I'll let ya have it for $50. Pfft.

This is the one I was looking at.
1622424078195.png
 

Synphul

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Needed real wood charcoal and found this over at Ace Hardware 30 Lbs for $24.99.


View attachment 182613
That's not too bad for natural wood coal. Usually seems to fluctuate here on price for kingsford coals, sometimes they're 2x15lb sometimes 2x20lb. Not sure what I usually pay for them, $15-20 or something.

Went ahead and ordered that grill. Was going to go check it out at home dildo, not a fan of that store. Had issues last time I went to get the cedar pickets 'oh we don't have any'. Check the website. 'Oh we do, found them'. They're a good 30-40min drive for me one way, figured I'd check before I got there. Unsure if they had any floor models, site said they had 2 left. Turns out they only had floor models. This of course after I asked about them and the person said 'oh we don't have any of those'. The website says you do. 'What's the sku? Oh, we do have some'. De ja fucking vu.

Called back to ask the guy if they were expecting anymore in, I'd rather one in a box. Easier than loading a pre assembled one into the back of the truck, having it bounce around and getting all jacked up and tweaking it around so nothing fits straight anymore. Not to mention who knows how badly it went together and they just jammed or forced it, left out nuts or bolts etc. Not that I don't trust them but hey, I've seen their handiwork. He couldn't really help me out much, so went back to the website and just ordered. People are so dysfunctional there. Saved a wasted trip.

I need to put some bricks down, better than I did for the last one. I can get those at lowes nearer by and pay less for them down in my area. And will have an idea of what length/size angle stock I need to patch the lid up to get a tighter seal. I've seen them use the gasket material on the flap doors on barrel style grills with tension clamps and that works well. This grill the lid is the whole half of the barrel not just a flap. Which works better for me, rather not have the ends closed off while it's open.
 

SteveS45

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For Kingsford I pay $20 FOR 2-20 Lb bags, at the Depot. These days I check stock on the Website because I have had A-Holes tell me they don't have it and I say, yes you do~! You have 700 of them in stock so get the MANAGER Please.
 

Synphul

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Member For 4 Years
For Kingsford I pay $20 FOR 2-20 Lb bags, at the Depot. These days I check stock on the Website because I have had A-Holes tell me they don't have it and I say, yes you do~! You have 700 of them in stock so get the MANAGER Please.
Seems to be a recurring thing with hd. Not a huge fan of either big box but if I have to choose prefer lowes. Usually I get my charcoal at wally world because it's closer than either of them. It's either a 20-25min drive to lowes down south or a 30-40min drive to lowes/hd up north. Walmart is 8-10min away. And do most of my shopping closer in town. Big box stores are kind of out of the way for me unless already making a run to one of the feed stores. For that matter may have to see what rural king has.

Speaking of, was looking at ways to upgrade the grill and saw a lot of people putting 2-3" thermometers at grill level on either end of the main box on an offset grill. Looked at them, by the time I found more economic adjustable thermometers that would've run me like $30 for the pair. So ended up grabbing an enzoo 4 channel wireless thermometer. Like $36 on amazon with the current discount. More features, low/high temp alarms, takes the place of a meat thermometer. Didn't realize how off the high mount oe thermometers could be. I figured they were ballpark, some talking their grill temps were 40-50F below what the lid thermometer was reading. May as well be a horn button with big bird on it like carseats have. lol.

I think I'm better off going with the digital. Comes with a couple grill clips so I can keep two of the leads where I want them and still have two for checking other stuff.
 

MyMagicMist

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Don't get me wrong, enjoy a good cook out. Never really got into being one into doing the cooking/grilling. Not something I get enthused about.

Then, don't reckon there's much I do get enthused about if honest. That's not saying I lack enjoyment, well, so so. My wiring is odd.
 

Synphul

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Don't get me wrong, enjoy a good cook out. Never really got into being one into doing the cooking/grilling. Not something I get enthused about.

Then, don't reckon there's much I do get enthused about if honest. That's not saying I lack enjoyment, well, so so. My wiring is odd.
I find it enjoyable. Sort of relaxing like being in the garden. I enjoy the smell of the smoke and cooking. Definitely not for everyone and if you don't enjoy it then it's more of a huge pain in the ass. Especially wood or charcoal. Not to say I'm great at it, I just enjoy it. lol
 

MyMagicMist

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I enjoy the smell of the smoke and cooking.

Think possibly that lacking a sense of smell causes there to be much I "miss out" on. Although not ever having smelled, not sure I even know what I miss. *chuckles*

Am told at times I'm lucky. Guess it is a plus and minus. Usually tend not to think so much on it. Does no good, life dealt it the way it is and no changing that.

For those with olfactory nerves they offer an experimental spray to simulate the sense of smell briefly. Wouldn't you know it? Left my olfactory nerves in my other body. *grin*
 
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gopher_byrd

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Don't get me wrong, enjoy a good cook out. Never really got into being one into doing the cooking/grilling. Not something I get enthused about.

Then, don't reckon there's much I do get enthused about if honest. That's not saying I lack enjoyment, well, so so. My wiring is odd.
You never know, but you may find you enjoy grilling when you get your own place. It's relaxing sitting out on the patio with a cold beer and a vape while attending to some tasty meat on the grill.

No need to go crazy on a grill, a smaller one like @SteveS45 has would be fine for you and the wife. I would have a hard time justifying spending $200 on a grill let alone $2K or more that I have seen online.
 

SteveS45

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You never know, but you may find you enjoy grilling when you get your own place. It's relaxing sitting out on the patio with a cold beer and a vape while attending to some tasty meat on the grill.

No need to go crazy on a grill, a smaller one like @SteveS45 has would be fine for you and the wife. I would have a hard time justifying spending $200 on a grill let alone $2K or more that I have seen online.

I have 3 grills and a smoker. Nothing better than preparing the whole meal on a BBQ grill on a sweltering summer day. Granted I BBQ all year long but I am not alone.
 

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